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This summer, Marketplace Tech is exploring tech in movies. Today, we’re looking at the Bruce Willis classic “Armageddon,” which was the highest-grossing film of 1998. That was 20 years ago, and fans still love the movie today. Willis’ character, Harry Stamper, is a "deep core" oil driller sent into space to drill a hole and drop a bomb in an asteroid that is hurtling toward Earth. We meet Harry on an offshore oil rig, managing a surly crew, with oil flying everywhere.

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This summer, Marketplace Tech is exploring tech in movies. Today, we’re looking at the Bruce Willis classic “Armageddon,” which was the highest-grossing film of 1998. Willis’ character, Harry Stamper, is a "deep core" oil driller sent into space to drill a hole and drop a bomb in an asteroid hurtling toward Earth. We meet Harry on an offshore oil rig, managing a surly crew, with oil flying everywhere. It's a depiction of oil-drilling life that has stuck with the public, but has very little to do with reality.

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Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET

More than 300 news publications across the country are joining together to defend the role of a free press and denounce President Trump's ongoing attacks on the news media in coordinated editorials publishing Thursday, according to a tally by The Boston Globe.

Russian officials were in Turkey on Tuesday, talking with the government there about possible solutions for Turkey’s currency crisis. Both countries are also facing U.S. sanctions, so one idea they floated: Stick to their own national currencies for trade and avoid using the dollar at all. On top of that, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov echoed statements from President Vladimir Putin that the United States is “abusing” its role as a global reserve currency. 

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A guide to the corporate board

Aug 15, 2018

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is in some hot water with regulators. That tweet he tossed off last week — when he went public about possibly taking Tesla private and having the funding already lined up — unleashed a raft of lawsuits. And members of Tesla’s board of directors are reportedly lawyering up. What do they have to worry about? Just about everything Musk does that could hurt shareholders. It comes with the territory.  

Cryptokitties have gripped the nation. Well, some of the nation. Cryptokitties are digital cartoon cats that you can buy and sell using a cryptocurrency known as Ethereum. There's a real and active market for them, and they rise and fall in value, just like stocks or bonds. One cryptokitty recently sold for $140,000. And the company that creates these non-fungible felines recently landed a $12 million cash injection from venture capitalists.

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Bonita Carlson grew up on a ranch in Northeast Wyoming. One time her mom was gone and she helped out with the laundry. Along with her clothes she threw in some of her dad's shirts.

"When I opened the washing machines [I] saw all of his records from the whole year of that calf crop ... was destroyed in the washing machines," recalls Carlson.

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There are a bunch of historical anniversaries in August. The Watts riots happened 53 years ago. Woodstock was 49 years ago today in fact. And then there's the 46th anniversary of Wattstax.

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Alton Lane CEO doesn't want shopping to feel like shopping

Aug 15, 2018

Today's retail landscape is full of companies trying to find a way to keep customers coming to brick-and-mortar stores, but Colin Hunter's company is going after customers who may not be all that interested in shopping in the first place. Hunter is the CEO and co-founder men's clothing retailer Alton Lane, which uses data, technology and the idea that clothes shopping isn't most men's idea of a good time in order to find an edge. Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke to Hunter about his company. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation. 

Determined to combat New Zealand's lofty housing prices, the country's lawmakers have trained their aim at a distant target: the buyers beyond their borders. By a close vote Wednesday, the Parliament passed a law banning most nonresident foreigners from purchasing existing homes or residential land.

What if we just do MAFTA and CAFTA instead?

Aug 15, 2018

It's been a year since the United States started NAFTA renegotiations with Canada and Mexico. Since then, Mexico has elected a new president and the U.S. has engaged in several controversial trade maneuvers. So are we any closer to signing a new deal? We'll catch you up. Also on today's show: We're hearing a lot from Elon Musk these days but what’s happening with Tesla and its board? Plus, another installment of our series Corner Office. This time we talk to Colin Hunter, co-founder and CEO of Alton Lane, about the future of men’s fashion retail.

Subscription box services may be the big apparel movement right now, but tech and data are allowing at least one company to go in a very different direction: custom tailoring. Colin Hunter is the CEO and co-founder of high-end men's fashion company Alton Lane, and his goal is to make that retail experience personal — like, really personal. His company uses body scanners to get your body measurements in a matter of seconds, which are then sent to fabric makers who construct garments to order (which, of course, is not cheap).

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