Economy & Business

Business news

Monday, Aug. 20, is Bailout Exit Day for Greece. The country’s prime minister has described Greece’s exit from a long bailout program as a moment of liberation. “Greece is regaining its political and economic independence,” Alexis Tsipras said, as he predicted a rosy future for the eurozone’s most heavily-indebted member state.     

Not all his fellow citizens are so optimistic.

The way credit scores are calculated is changing

Aug 15, 2018

A report from the New York Federal Reserve this week finds that the big reporting agencies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — have started excluding certain items that used to be considered negative dings on our credit.

Just days after President Trump tweeted his decision to double tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum, Turkey has announced that it, too, is ratcheting up retaliatory tariffs.

"Tax rates on imports of some products have been increased on a reciprocal basis against the U.S. administration's deliberate attacks on our economy," the country's vice president, Fuat Oktay, said in a pair of tweets.

(Markets Edition) The stock market experienced a down day today. In addition to drops in the Dow and S&P, Europe and Asia markets also fell. We talked with Susan Schmidt, senior portfolio manager at Westwood Holdings, who mentioned speculation that the downward trend in Asia might have been due to some unfortunate earnings reports. Also, the online job-finding company Indeed put together a list that outlines which cities have the ideal blend of higher pay and decent cost-of-living.

Where will your paycheck go the furthest?

Aug 15, 2018

Indeed.com has crunched the numbers on salary and cost of living in 185 metro areas and come up with a list of cities where your salary will go the furthest. The list also indicates where economic and job opportunities will likely be strongest going forward. The top cities are Duluth, Minnesota; Wilmington, North Carolina; Lubbock, Texas; and San Antonio, Texas. See which other towns made the grade.

Major department stores report their earnings this week, starting with Macy’s on Wednesday, followed by Nordstrom and J.C. Penney on Thursday. After a retail slump and slide over many quarters, Americans are coming back to shopping, and the numbers show stores are enjoying the trend.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(U.S. Edition) The Turkish lira rebounded again today, but there's been no cooldown in the ongoing feud between Turkey and the U.S. About a week after the U.S. raised tariffs on Turkish metals, Turkey followed suit with a tariff hike of its own on many items from the U.S. It's the latest move in this economic tug-of-war between the two countries, and we speak to the BBC's Turkey correspondent to hear about next steps. Also, we got a reading on retail sales that should be up, and we talk to Marketplace's Erika Beras for more.

Are we witnessing the renaissance of retail stores?

Aug 15, 2018

Your shopping experience might now include flutes of champagne, meticulously designed décor, and "robot" hands spraying you with fragrances. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … A political and economic feud between the U.S. and Turkey escalated after Turkey doubled tariffs on American goods including passenger cars and alcohol. We’ll bring you the very latest details from Istanbul. Then, South Korea’s president said he’ll connect his roads and railways to North Korea by the end of the year – progress after the summit between the two nations earlier this year. Afterwards, Mongolia is rich in copper, coal, gold, and one pre-historic commodity that’s struggling to keep safe from smugglers.

Why a diverse workplace can reduce cases of harassment and bullying

Aug 15, 2018

Toxic workplaces and problematic bosses are, as we've explored in recent days, difficult and complicated problems for employer and employees alike. Some experts recommend you confront your harasser, even if he or she is the boss.

How much do you pay for internet service each month? The National Digital Inclusion Alliance found that lots of customers are paying about $60 a month for their internet packages. Some get super slow internet speeds, while others get super fast speeds. Marketplace Tech guest host Amy Choi talked to Angela Siefer, executive director of the NDIA, about these speed disparities and the impact. Siefer described what service might look like for a household paying full-service prices, but stuck with outdated internet infrastructure.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

At any given time, there are thousands of cargo ships sailing the world's oceans. Once in a while, a ship's crew can be told to wait - and wait - outside of a port.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

How much do you pay for internet service each month? And what do you get for that price? The National Digital Inclusion Alliance found that lots of customers are paying about $60 a month for their internet packages. And, some get super slow internet speeds, while others get super fast speeds. Internet service providers say they’re working to upgrade networks for everyone. Today on the show, NDIA executive director Angela Siefer talks with us about what it means for families paying full service prices for outdated internet service. (08/15/2018)

Pages