Education

Editor's note: This story describes graphic allegations of sexual abuse.

The University of Southern California says it has reached a tentative class action settlement agreement worth $215 million over allegations of sexual harassment and abuse by a gynecologist who used to work at its student health center.

Approximately 500 current and former students have accused gynecologist George Tyndall of misconduct, according to The Associated Press.

"Thank YOU," writes Cara Christensen, a first-grade teacher in Washington state who read NPR's deep dive into the troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (PSLF). The reporting, she says, "made me feel not so alone."

We received dozens of emails, tweets and Facebook comments from aggrieved borrowers responding to news that, over the past year, 99 percent of applications for the popular loan-forgiveness program have been denied.

uwm-john-schroeder-history-author-book
Jason Rieve

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has grown tremendously over the past 60 years, from just over 6,000 students to more than 27,000. More impressive is the growth of the university’s academic programs, which have helped make UWM one of the top research universities in the United States. It’s a fascinating story that has been captured in a new book: The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee The First Sixty Years, 1956-2016.

Midterms 2018: Take It To The House

Oct 18, 2018

No, this year’s elections aren’t presidential. But they’ve taken on a new resonance due to the strong backlash among Democrats to the policies of President Trump and his majority-Republican Congress.

In this show, we’re talking about the House of Representatives. (We know that you really want to talk about the Senate contest between Beto O’Rourke and Ted Cruz … and, okay, we probably will.)

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The skinny boy says he's 12, though he looks years younger. He points to a crayon drawing he created this summer, when he arrived at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa, Syria.

It's mostly colored in black. There's a tank. An aircraft. A crude figure of a man with a wispy beard holding an oversized gun.

"This is when ISIS shelled my home," he says. "My sister and niece were killed. Just like that, two missiles."

In the picture, there's a red tongue of flame rising from the roof of his home.

Update: Many student borrowers have responded to this story by sharing stories of their struggles with PSLF. We've curated many of them here.

On the morning of Monday, Aug. 27, Seth Frotman told his two young daughters that he would likely be home early that day and could take them to the playground. They cheered.

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Does Harvard University discriminate against Asian-Americans in its admissions process?

That's the question on trial in a Boston federal courtroom this week. At issue is whether Harvard unfairly discriminated against an Asian-American applicant who says the Ivy League school held him to higher standards than applicants of other races. This trial will also dissect a contentious political issue in higher education: affirmative action.

But what exactly is affirmative action, and how did it become such a controversial issue?

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What is the United States willing to do about the disappearance of a journalist?

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A federal lawsuit alleging Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants goes to court this week in Boston.

While the case focuses on Harvard, it could have big consequences for higher education, especially if it moves on to the U.S. Supreme Court. At stake is 40 years of legal precedent allowing race to be one factor in deciding which students to admit.

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A controversial affirmative action case begins Monday in Boston, and activists on both sides of the issue were out protesting today.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Shouting) Stand up, fight back.

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You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

New school shooting database shows 2018 spike

A new database released this week finds that 2018 was a record year for school violence.

The researchers cross-referenced more than 1,300 incident reports from 25 different sources going back nearly 50 years. This K-12 school shooting database tried to capture each and every instance a gun was brandished or a bullet was fired on school property.

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