Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Bonnie North

Lake Effect producer and co-host Bonnie North is away from the station for a few weeks, but she is at work.  Bonnie is a part of a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission that will take her to several countries in Europe.

She recently visited the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, for a briefing on the organization’s history and current efforts underway in the global landscape.

Courtesy of the Pabst Mansion

This weekend’s Doors Open Milwaukee allows visitors into some remarkable spaces that are not typically open to the public. But there are other, remarkable spaces around the city that people can visit annually. Take the Pabst Mansion, an example of the Gilded Age that has stood for more than a century on Milwaukee's near-west side.

Bonnie North

Lake Effect producer and co-host Bonnie North is away from the WUWM station for a few weeks, but she's still working. Bonnie is participating in a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission that will take her to several European countries.

"The Commission was set up when reunification happened in Germany to, basically, give German and American journalists a chance to meet each other and learn how we do our jobs in different countries," North explains.

Courtesy of Dawn Springer

Percussion has always had a happy marriage with dancing. No matter the type of dance — social or artistic — we often find ourselves moving to the rhythm of the beat.

Ross Zentner

The musical "Pippinpremiered on Broadway in 1972. The music was written by Stephen Schwartz (the composer behind "Wicked" and "Godspell"), the production was directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, and it starred Ben Vereen.

"Pippin" tells the story of a young prince's search for meaning and breaks the fourth wall as it describes his drive for existential significance. Although the characters are based on royals from the Middle Ages, the fictionalized story is perennial, and the show continues to find success decades after its premiere. 

Kevin J. Miyazaki / Sculpture Milwaukee

Sculpture Milwaukee is a month away from wrapping up its second year of art installations along Wisconsin Avenue.  This year, it was bracketed on one end by Robert Indiana’s iconic Love sculpture on the east and Ana Prvacka’s Stealing Shadows, Michelangelo to the west.

JoAnna Bautch, Latino Arts

Alberto Villalobos is probably best known for his music. He's one-third of the ensemble Villalobos Brothers, an ensemble that performs traditional Mexican music with a contemporary flair. He's also a visual artist, working in oils, papier-mâché, and clay.

lapandr / Fotolia

It’s virtually fall in Milwaukee. And that means the area’s arts organizations have started new seasons. There are big titles and some lesser-known ones on offer, from concerts at the new Fiserv Forum to small gallery shows.

Milwaukee Magazine previews the fall arts season from the theater, arts and entertainment scenes in its current issue.

Junior Hansen Jr.

While there are aspects of the news coming out of Washington that sound like satire, it’s hard to be sure. With Will Durst, an award-winning political satirist and Milwaukee native, you can be sure it's satire. Though he now lives in California’s Bay Area, Durst is back in his home state for shows in Madison and Milwaukee before touring in Europe.

"I know what you're going to ask and I don't know!" Durst says right off the bat. "I've heard that people are so tired of hearing about Trump, I've heard that people can't get enough of Trump."

Konvergencie

Every month we talk with internationally reknowned cellist Robert Cohen about the life of a touring professional musician. This month, we find Cohen getting ready to go to Slovakia to perform as part of a festival called Konvergencie, or Covergences in English.

Roger Goun

Almost four decades ago, a Milwaukee music ensemble performed its first concert to an audience of about 30 people. From those humble beginnings grew Present Music, an artistic fixture on the Milwaukee arts calendar.

The brainchild of conductor and trumpeter Kevin Stalheim, Present Music has a devoted audience for a genre of music that often gets no love: contemporary classical music. Stalheim says the idea to start the group 37 years ago came out of a trip to Amsterdam to hang out with The Netherlands Wind Ensemble:

Milwaukee Short Film Festival

The Milwaukee Short Film Festival takes place this Friday, Sept. 7, and Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Fox Bay Cinema and Grill in Whitefish Bay. Fifty films will be screened over the two days, including the first film shown at the festival 20 years ago.

Ross Bigley, the festival's founder and director, recalls that the festival began as a simple gathering at a coffee shop with a projector. "When I was making these short films, there was really no place in Milwaukee to screen anything like that," he says.

Bonnie North

Jazz is a distinctly American art form. But musicians from other cultures and countries have found their way into it and have made it their own.

Cuba is a prime example. This small island country off the coast of Florida has put its cultural stamp on jazz with giants like Tito Puente, Arturo Sandoval, and Chucho Valdes. American jazz artists like Cal Tjader and Dizzy Gillespie looked to Cuba and took its Latin influences into their own music. And now another generation of Cuban musicians takes center stage.

Jon Mattrisch

Every year, Milwaukee Magazine devotes an issue to the best of Milwaukee and the surrounding area.   

This year's "Best of MKE" is the first time in recent memory that the editors have turned to the readers for their thoughts, says Carole Nicksin, editor and publisher of Milwaukee Magazine. Choosing from nominees selected by magazine editors, the readership voted on everything from Best Burger to Best Esthetician.

"We just decided to change it up and hear from readers," explains Nicksin.

MIAD

Milwaukee is awash in the sound of motorcycle engines this weekend. Riders from around the world have gathered here to celebrate Harley-Davidson’s 115th anniversary. It’s an event that the late artist Mathew Hintz would have loved.

Hintz graduated from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design in the late 1990s, and in 1998 received a styling and graphic design internship with Harley-Davidson.

Pages