Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Bonnie North

In the Internet era, the lines between local, national and international news are blurred. If you want to read a story from the newspaper in Helsinki, Finland, or Johannesburg, South Africa, it just takes a few clicks of a mouse or taps on your smartphone, and you’re there.

Courtesy of Robert Cohen

When people think about the concept of arrangements in music (if they do at all), they often it in the folk music world, in which an arranger takes a piece of music from the folk canon and arranges it for an instrument. But arrangements have an important place in the classical music universe, as well.

Each month, we speak with contributor Robert Cohen about the work of a touring classical musician in a feature called “On That Note.” For October, Cohen spoke with Lake Effect’s Bonnie North about why arrangements are so important in classical music.

Bonnie North

Lake Effect's Bonnie North is in Europe this month as part of a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission.  It's a program that exposes American journalists to the workings of European politics and media. 

Lois Greenfield

Despite her young age, Chelsea Hoy has become an influential name in the field of Irish dance. Hoy is the associate artistic director and choreographer for the Milwaukee and Chicago-based, nationally touring Trinity Irish Dance Company.  The company was founded nearly 30 years ago and terms itself the “birthplace of progressive Irish dance.”

helen_f / Fotolia

Last month, director of the Manfred Olson Planetarium at UW-Milwaukee and our regular astronomy contributor, Jean Creighton explained how the sun stays together, even though it is made of gasses and plasma.

READ: Here Comes The Sun, But What Holds It Together?

Carl Sandburg was a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, poet and editor. While he’s considered to be one of the major figures of contemporary literature, his works aren't as well known as other literary luminaries.

But one Milwaukee actor hopes to change that. Jonathan Gillard Daly's one-man show, "The Eagle in Me," recreates Sandburg's own traveling show which journeyed through the heart of America showcasing his poetry and vast collection of American folk songs.

Bonnie North

Lake Effect producer and co-host Bonnie North is away from the station for a few weeks, but she is at work.  Bonnie is a part of a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission that will take her to several countries in Europe.

She recently visited the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, for a briefing on the organization’s history and current efforts underway in the global landscape.

Courtesy of the Pabst Mansion

This weekend’s Doors Open Milwaukee allows visitors into some remarkable spaces that are not typically open to the public. But there are other, remarkable spaces around the city that people can visit annually. Take the Pabst Mansion, an example of the Gilded Age that has stood for more than a century on Milwaukee's near-west side.

Bonnie North

Lake Effect producer and co-host Bonnie North is away from the WUWM station for a few weeks, but she's still working. Bonnie is participating in a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission that will take her to several European countries.

"The Commission was set up when reunification happened in Germany to, basically, give German and American journalists a chance to meet each other and learn how we do our jobs in different countries," North explains.

Courtesy of Dawn Springer

Percussion has always had a happy marriage with dancing. No matter the type of dance — social or artistic — we often find ourselves moving to the rhythm of the beat.

Ross Zentner

The musical "Pippinpremiered on Broadway in 1972. The music was written by Stephen Schwartz (the composer behind "Wicked" and "Godspell"), the production was directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse, and it starred Ben Vereen.

"Pippin" tells the story of a young prince's search for meaning and breaks the fourth wall as it describes his drive for existential significance. Although the characters are based on royals from the Middle Ages, the fictionalized story is perennial, and the show continues to find success decades after its premiere. 

Kevin J. Miyazaki / Sculpture Milwaukee

Sculpture Milwaukee is a month away from wrapping up its second year of art installations along Wisconsin Avenue.  This year, it was bracketed on one end by Robert Indiana’s iconic Love sculpture on the east and Ana Prvacka’s Stealing Shadows, Michelangelo to the west.

JoAnna Bautch, Latino Arts

Alberto Villalobos is probably best known for his music. He's one-third of the ensemble Villalobos Brothers, an ensemble that performs traditional Mexican music with a contemporary flair. He's also a visual artist, working in oils, papier-mâché, and clay.

lapandr / Fotolia

It’s virtually fall in Milwaukee. And that means the area’s arts organizations have started new seasons. There are big titles and some lesser-known ones on offer, from concerts at the new Fiserv Forum to small gallery shows.

Milwaukee Magazine previews the fall arts season from the theater, arts and entertainment scenes in its current issue.

Junior Hansen Jr.

While there are aspects of the news coming out of Washington that sound like satire, it’s hard to be sure. With Will Durst, an award-winning political satirist and Milwaukee native, you can be sure it's satire. Though he now lives in California’s Bay Area, Durst is back in his home state for shows in Madison and Milwaukee before touring in Europe.

"I know what you're going to ask and I don't know!" Durst says right off the bat. "I've heard that people are so tired of hearing about Trump, I've heard that people can't get enough of Trump."

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