Bonnie North

Lake Effect Producer / Co-host

Bonnie joined WUWM in March 2006 as the Arts Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

Bonnie spent over twenty years working as a director, technician and stage manager in professional, educational, and community theaters. She comes from a family of musicians and artists and grew up playing all kinds of music. But her interest in and love of the arts is not limited to performance. She enjoys other art expressions as well, including painting, sculpture, photography, textiles, and writing.

Bonnie's introduction to Public Broadcasting came at Vermont Public Radio (VPR) in 1992. She spent 7 years there in various positions, including hosting classical and jazz shows and as a production associate and operations manager.

Just prior to joining WUWM, Bonnie worked in the defense industry. She spent two years in the Balkans, first in Sarajevo, Bosnia, where she managed a group of linguists that provided Serbo-Croatian interpreting and translation services for the US and NATO stabilization forces. She then went to Kosovo to manage the overall linguist program for Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, and Romania.

Bonnie holds a bachelors degree in English Literature/Drama Studies from Purchase College-State University of New York.

Ways to Connect

Traveling Lemur Productions

Many Milwaukee theatregoers have seen Angela Iannone act on local stages over the years. She is a talented, passionate, and consummate artist. And she brings those same qualities to her playwriting. Theatre Red’s production of her play, "This Prison Where I Live," is currently on stage at the theatre space in the Big Red Church on 10th Street and Wisconsin Avenue.

Kwasniewski, Roman B.J./Roman Kwasniewski Photographs, UWM Archives; Marc Tasman

Look Here! is a collaboration between the UWM Libraries and artists from RedLine Milwaukee and the UWM Peck School of the Arts. It was two years in the research and making, and was installed at the Villa Terrace Museum on Milwaukee’s east side earlier this summer.

Ross Zentner

If you've ever seen a Milwaukee Opera Theatre (MOT) production, you already know they don’t present your normal operatic fare. If you’ve never seen a Milwaukee Opera Theatre production — from "The Mikado" performed with toy pianos and handmade percussion, to a mashup of opera and heavy metal called "Guns and Rosenkavalier" — a performance by MOT is sure to shake out any assumptions about opera you might have

The Independent Eye

Milwaukee Fringe Festival opens this weekend with performances from around the country. One of those performances is a new work from Elizabeth Fuller and Conrad Bishop, who started their theater careers in Milwaukee.

Milwaukee Fringe Festival / facebook.com

Though the days of summer are waning and theater companies have opened and closed late summer productions, the fall season is still a few weeks away. In the interim, Milwaukeeans can enjoy home-grown Fringe Festival, on stage at the Marcus Center this Saturday and Sunday.

Ben Folds / facebook.com

Ben Folds is a renaissance man. He’s a songwriter, an accomplished pianist, a producer for other artists, an actor, a passionate photographer, and a storyteller. In 2017, he was named an artistic advisor to the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center.

Ben Binversie

The Canadian band The Stanfields don’t fit into any one musical mould. They’re hard driving rock 'n' roll, they’re a bit rootsy, and they also draw on the Scots and Irish fiddle traditions of their Nova Scotian home.

"You know, there’s a lot of stuff we’re doing now that we weren’t ready to play [before], because...we’ve evolved," says Jon Landry. "And we’ve evolved together in these last three years in ways that I never would have imagined when I think back to the times we were throwing chairs at each other."

Ben Binversie

Canadian musician Shreem is Jay Andrews, originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, and now based in Toronto. He's in Milwaukee to perform at Irish Fest all weekend. Shreem uses traditional Cape Breton fiddle tunes is his music, but his mix of very traditional fiddle tunes, hip hop, overdubs, and house is unique in the world of Celtic music.

Lauren Sigfusson

The five piece Irish band Seo Linn has a distinctive style that combines the traditional sense of Irish music along with the new. Performing and writing music in English and Irish, Seo Linn sometimes switches languages in mid-song. The group's original songs, Irish covers of pop tunes and high energy stage show has catapulted them from barely being a band to headlining shows internationally.

microphone-stringtet-music-milwaukee
Bonnie North

The distinctive sound of The Jason Seed Stringtet is two parts classical, one part jazz, and more than a little bit rock and roll. Seed, who is both the ensemble's guitarist as well as its composer, has married the timbres of electric guitar, piano, violin, viola, cello, and double bass in both original tunes and covers since 2008.

Lauren Sigfusson

A fire truck making its way to a scene, sirens blazing, is a common sight in cities and towns across America. But within the Milwaukee Fire Department (MFD), there's a support staff responsible for maintaining all the equipment firefighters depend on.

For this week's Bubbler Talk — our series that allows you to ask WUWM questions about Milwaukee —questioner Jay Blanchett wanted to know about a special kind of fire truck:

leaf-bowl-ceramic-art-jean-wells
Neil Estrick

The Morning Glory Fine Craft Fair takes place on the Marcus Center grounds Aug. 11-12. It’s the signature event of the Wisconsin Designer Crafts Council — an organization started in Milwaukee more than 100 years ago to help foster excellence in the fine craft community across the state.

Nurmes Festival, Finland

Every month, we talk with our contributor, cellist Robert Cohen, about life as a touring classical musician. He is a former member of a Milwaukee-based ensemble and spent time here each year, even as he maintained (and still maintains) a household in England and various tours around the world.

Sarah Kendzior is the kind of journalist people love to hate. She is relentless in her pursuit of the truth, she does not mince words, and she is unafraid of powerful people. She is not in this business to make friends and she’s had the death threats to prove it.

Kendzior is also something of a seer - her essays written for the Al Jazeera English Channel in 2012 and 2013 predicted the rise of Donald Trump and the outcome of the 2016 election before anyone else in the media was taking the campaign seriously.

Bill Dunford / NASA

When we talk about proper alignment, we’re often talking about our spines, or our priorities, or perhaps our metaphysical place in the universe.

Contributor Jean Creighton is all for those kinds of calibrations, but the kind of alignment she wants to talk about in this month’s astronomy chat is planetary.

"We have an unusual situation where we can see four planets, practically simultaneously, in the night sky," she notes.

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