Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

With just hours to go before the official announcement, President Trump has made a decision on his pick for the next Supreme Court justice, a source close to the decision-making process tells NPR's Mara Liasson.

But there is still no indication which of the four finalists it will be.

As of Monday morning, Trump was still deciding among Judges Thomas Hardiman, Brett Kavanaugh, Raymond Kethledge and Amy Coney Barrett.

The IRS is planning to unveil a new tax return form — as soon as Friday — that is the size of a large postcard.

It's been touted as a way to simplify tax filing and is something President Trump pushed congressional Republicans to come up with. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the document "will be a postcard, as we've promised, and hard-working taxpayers won't have to spend as much time filling out their taxes."

Sounds good, right? Imagine, filing your taxes on a postcard. What could be easier?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 3:01 p.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday he intends to nominate a replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy from a list of names he first compiled during his 2016 campaign. He told reporters he had recently added five more names to the list. Here is a look at who is under consideration:

The Trump administration will not impose blanket restrictions on Chinese investment in the U.S., but will instead rely on enhancements to an existing review process in an effort to protect the country's sensitive technology know-how.

The decision follows a lengthy debate within the administration over how to deal with China's aggressive push into industries of the future and what the White House considers China's unfair treatment of U.S. firms' intellectual property.

The Department of Homeland Security says 1,995 minors were separated from their "alleged adult guardians" at the southern border in just over a monthlong period.

A DHS spokesman said the separations occurred between April 19 and the end of May under the administration's relatively new "zero tolerance" policy, in which parents have also been arrested.

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Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

President Trump, in a freewheeling impromptu news conference in front of the White House on Friday morning, said the Justice Department inspector general's report looking into the FBI's investigation of Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server "totally exonerates me."

Updated at 12:31 p.m. ET

A federal judge ordered Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, to jail on Friday following allegations by prosecutors that he tampered with witnesses in his case.

"You've abused the trust placed in you six months ago," said Judge Amy Berman Jackson. "I thought about this long and hard, Mr. Manafort. I have no appetite for this."

But Berman Jackson said she could not turn a blind eye to the charges that Manafort had attempted to contact witnesses in his case after he was on bail.

Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET

President Trump is calling on the Group of 7 to readmit Russia to the group of leading economic powers, saying "we should have Russia at the negotiating table."

Moscow was kicked out of the group, then the G-8, four years ago after it annexed Crimea. It had been invited to join the group in the 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union. But after Russia's intervention in Ukraine and annexation of Crimea, Western leaders sought to isolate Vladimir Putin's government.

Tuesday's primary election in New Mexico moved the country one step closer to putting the first Native-American woman in Congress.

Deb Haaland won the Democratic nomination in New Mexico's heavily Democratic 1st district. The former state party chair beat two other candidates. Haaland is a member of the Laguna Pueblo tribe.

In her victory speech Tuesday night, Haaland said "New Mexico made history," adding that hers was a "victory for working people, a victory for women and a victory for everyone who has been sidelined by the billionaire class."

Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

There was God Bless America, but no Swoop the Eagle. The U.S. Marine Band was there, but neither quarterback Nick Foles, nor head coach Doug Pederson, nor any member of the 2018 Super Bowl winning team was at the White House Tuesday for what was to be a celebration of the Philadelphia Eagles victory.

Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET

Former President Bill Clinton revisited the controversy over his affair with Monica Lewinsky on Monday, saying he does not feel he owes the former White House intern an apology.

Clinton, interviewed on NBC's Today show by correspondent Craig Melvin, was asked if he had ever apologized to Lewinsky:

Melvin: "I asked if you'd ever apologized. And you said you had."

Clinton: "I have."

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

The Trump administration made good on threats to impose tariffs on some of the nation's closest allies Thursday, announcing it will no longer exempt Canada, Mexico and the European Union from previously announced levies on steel and aluminum.

The announcement was made in Paris by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Over Memorial Day weekend, President Trump tweeted that people should "put pressure on the Democrats to end the horrible law that separates children from there parents once they cross the Border into the U.S."

The president implied that children were being separated from their parents at the border because of a law enacted by Democrats.

Actually, the policy in question was enacted by his own administration.

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