Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

VINCENT DESJARDINS, FLICKR

Last year, the ACLU sued the city of Milwaukee, based on the police department’s stop-and-frisk program. An analysis of police stops in Milwaukee found significant racial bias in who was being stopped and the areas where these stops were occurring.

Will Skaggs

The Hoan Bridge is an iconic part of Milwaukee’s skyline — at least during the day. A local initiative is hoping to add it to the night sky as well.

xixinxing / Fotolia

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are on the rise throughout the United States. In its most recent report, the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported the highest-ever number of STIs in America.

The Milwaukee-area has seen an especially significant rise of STIs over the past few years, including 29 percent increase in syphilis infections, and a 13 percent increase in HIV.

Teran Powell

The Wisconsin partisan primary is over and the results have set the stage for the general election in November. To help put those results into perspective, Lake Effect's Joy Powers chatted with Lilly Goren, professor of political science at Carroll University.

VIEW: Wisconsin 2018 Primary Election Results

pizza-man-fire-milwaukee
Collen Durkin

In the early hours of January 19, 2010, residents on Milwaukee’s East Side awoke to a loud boom. Within minutes, apartments and businesses were engulfed in flames. As the embers dulled, it became clear to investigators they were dealing with arson.

Although no one was mortally wounded in the blast and ensuing fire, the wounds inflicted on the community continue to linger. The loss of one business — Pizza Man — is still a sore spot for many Milwaukeeans.

Milwaukee Public Museum

Searching through old records can be excruciating. Beyond being disorganized and often unclear, many records are lost over time, and the headache of finding just one document can easily triple the time it takes you to do your job.

Over the last couple decades, many organizations have set out to digitize their records as a way of preserving them and making them easier to find. But that, too, takes time.

The Milwaukee Public Museum has been working to digitize their entire collection for years. Almost three years ago, the museum started a push to rapidly digitize.

George Grantham Bain / Wikimedia

Progress is not always linear, and that maxim holds especially true for house cats. While their popularity has wavered over the centuries, cats have been an integral part of human history for millennia.

"They were domesticated, they were raised to the highest of the highs and they were plunged down to the lowest of the lows and then very, very slowly by the end of the 19th century, they finally built themselves up to be companions again," says Paul Koudounaris.

Diego Brito / Flickr

It’s been more than two decades since the Salvadoran Civil War ended, but the refugees the crisis created are once again in the news.

Since 1990, Salvadorans have been granted Temporary Protected Status in the United States. But earlier this year, the Trump administration stripped them of their protection, ordering nearly 200,000 people to return to El Salvador.

Sara Stathas

The raw water (or wild water) trend has been growing over the past few years in the United States. People search for wild springs, supplied by aquifers, gather it in containers (often glass bottles), and drink.

Some in the movement have eschewed modern sources of water, which go through heavy filtration to ensure its safety. Others are drawn to raw water for its purported health benefits. 

Audrey Nowakowski

For WUWM's third Lake Effect On-Site, the team headed to Riverwest to pay special attention to a unique Milwaukee neighborhood.

In front of a crowd at the Riverwest Public House, Lake Effect's Mitch Teich and Bonnie North dug into some of what makes Riverwest so special — its history, the biking community, and its co-op culture:

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Courtesy of Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

What was the Eagles Ballroom before it became The Rave? That’s a question we’ve heard a lot at Bubbler Talk and it turns out there are a lot of answers.

The Eagles Club on Wisconsin Avenue was first completed in 1926. It was the headquarters for the Milwaukee Aerie of the Fraternal Order of the Eagles – a national social organization with a rather illustrious history.

General Services Administration / Wikimedia

The unrest in Milwaukee's Sherman Park neighborhood happened nearly two years ago, but a new court case has renewed public interest in the events of that time. Earlier this month, community activist Vaun Mayes was charged with planning to firebomb the District 7 Police Station, around the time of the unrest. 

Stuart Meek

Cases of lyme disease are on the rise in counties throughout the Northeast and Midwest, including here in Wisconsin. We're currently in the peak transmission season, when the majority of people who contract lyme disease will be infected. 

Experts advise people do a thorough check of their bodies after spending time outdoors. And while you're doing that, you could help some local researchers learn more about how to prevent the spread of lyme disease. 

Q. M. Sgt. Leon H. Caverly/Army / Wikimedia

As we approach the centenniel anniversary of Armistice Day, there has been a growing conversation about the impact the first World War had on the U.S. and the world as a whole. Now celebrated as Veterans Day, the war famously ended at the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month in 1918. 

Joy Powers

As laws governing urban farming have been repealed around the Milwaukee area, more people have started keeping backyard chicken coops. 

This comes as good news for Karen Krumenacher, owner of Royal Roost - a local consulting service that offers help to backyard chicken farmers, like herself. She explains, "I try to make it easy and take all the guesswork out for people, because what I’ve found is what you read on the internet is pretty scary."

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