Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Lacy Landre

Milwaukee history is inextricably linked to immigration, from the first German, French, and English immigrants who shaped the city’s founding, to Polish and Irish immigrants that helped build it into an industrial powerhouse, to the Latino immigrants that have redefined the near south side.

Sara Stathas

Buying a new home can be stressful. There are a million things to consider, but the biggest component is almost always the neighborhood.

This month Milwaukee Magazine’s cover story featured a list of neighborhoods to fit every budget, in areas throughout and around the city. Kristine Hansen is the author of the article and she spoke with Lake Effect’s Joy Powers about some of the overarching elements of the areas where people are looking to buy.

Frank Herzog / Fotolia

This week, China announced yet another set of tariffs targeting U.S. goods. This is just the latest move in what some are calling a trade war, sparked by the United State’s decision to set tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum.

Maria C. Maldonado

If you’re involved in community activism in Milwaukee, it’s likely you’ve met Markasa Tucker.

She’s the leader of several advocacy groups, including the African-American RoundtableUBLAC Milwaukee, and The Alternative.

50 Miles More

This post has been updated.

A week after the national school walkout, some Wisconsin students went the extra mile, or this case - 50 miles, to protest gun violence. The students wrapped up a four-day, 50-mile march from Madison to Janesville Wednesday, following last weekend's nationwide March For Our Lives rallies.  And the organizers say their work isn't done, even if the march is.

Katie Eder says gun violence isn't a political issue; but rather, students are literally fighting for their lives.

North American Family Institute / facebook.com

Project Milwaukee: To Protect and Serve has been addressing the often strained relationship between Milwaukee’s Police Department and the communities it’s sworn to protect. However, these issues aren’t unique to Milwaukee. Many urban communities are facing the same kinds of problems with police and community members.

John Sturdy

There’s a growing body of research on the importance of human-to-human contact. Studies have found that physical interactions with other people can reduce stress, improve physical health, and increase compassion.

So it may be unsurprising that more and more people are turning to professional cuddlers to improve their overall well-being.

Jonathan McIntosh / Flickr

Since the election of President Donald Trump, the conversation around U.S. immigration has been tense. As Trump’s calls for a border wall have become more fervent, the realities of what it takes to emigrate to this country have often been obscured. Marquette University hoped to illuminate the experience of crossing the U.S. border in an immersive spring break trip to Texas.

Joy Powers

Distiller Brian Sammons is a do-it-yourself kind of guy. As founder of Twisted Path Distillery in Bay View, Sammons has taken his own twisted path to the profession and an equally unorthodox approach to his craft. 

ronniechua / Fotolia

Around the country, including here in Wisconsin, thousands of students walked out of school to demand action on gun control. The organized walk out comes after the latest high-profile school shooting which resulted in 17 deaths at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

Joy Powers

Bowling. It’s as Wisconsin as cheese curds and Packers gear. Some have even called Milwaukee "America’s 10-pin Capital" in reference to ten-pin bowling, the most common form of the sport. But there’s another kind of bowling that’s also popular in the area, and it’s a little quacky. 

Listener Shelley Peters reached out to Bubbler Talk because she wanted to know more about it.

J. Albert Bowden II / Flickr

It’s Sunshine Week, and that’s not a crack about the weather. The annual event is an effort led by news organizations, that seeks to inform people about their right to access public information. It’s a right that has had many enemies - both historically and currently - but it’s also a right that has endured many tests.

Mike Morbeck / Flickr

Anyone who watches sports - either in person or on TV - has seen them. The fans sitting in Lambeau Field on a 15 degree December day, with their shirts off, bodies covered in green and gold paint. Or the the guy driving down the street in a car painted in the Brewers’ color scheme.

Adam Ryan Morris

When you talk about regional cuisine, things like Cajun food in New Orleans, seafood in Boston, or southern barbecue come to mind. But when it comes to Wisconsin, a feature in this month’s Milwaukee Magazine makes the point that the food itself is only part of the picture.

Readers would be forgiven if they believed Kelly Barnhill’s latest collection of stories is aimed at children.

Barnhill is a previous winner of the Newbery Medal, given to children’s book authors, and the collection, called Dreadful Young Ladies, features a delicate dragonfly on its cover. But the stories it contains are full of dark and mature themes, not meant for adolescents or the faint of heart. 

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