Mitch Teich

Lake Effect Executive Producer / Co-host

Mitch joined WUWM in February 2006 as the Executive Producer of the locally produced weekday magazine program Lake Effect.

He brings over 27 years of broadcasting experience from radio stations across the country - in Iowa, Minnesota, New York, and Arizona. Prior to joining WUWM, Mitch served as News Director of KNAU - Arizona Public Radio, Executive Producer of the station's monthly news magazine program, and anchored and produced news programming.

He has won many awards including several regional awards from the Radio Television News Directors Association and national awards from PRNDI - Public Radio News Directors Inc.

He holds a bachelors degree in Political Science from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa. He lives in Wauwatosa with his wife Gretchen, daughter Sylvi and son Charlie. Mitch fills his copious spare time looking for his reading glasses, watching his beloved Boston Red Sox and cheering on his children on the ice rinks, ballfields, and cycling tracks of southeastern Wisconsin.

Ways to Connect

Mitch Teich

The complex world of carbon trading and energy speculation might not seem, at first blush, to be fertile ground for a suspense novel.  But it's familiar territory for writer Paul Schueller — who might not seem, at first blush, to be a likely candidate to write suspense.

Ed Bierman / Flickr

The Milwaukee Public Museum is currently seeking a new location. Advocates of the project say both the museum’s public space and its offices and archives are largely outdated and inadequate for a modern museum and research facility.

Bonnie North

Lake Effect producer and co-host Bonnie North is away from the WUWM station for a few weeks, but she's still working. Bonnie is participating in a journalism fellowship through the RIAS Berlin Commission that will take her to several European countries.

"The Commission was set up when reunification happened in Germany to, basically, give German and American journalists a chance to meet each other and learn how we do our jobs in different countries," North explains.

Max Thomsen

Several Milwaukee institutions and organizations are coming together to bring attention to the interconnection of race, trauma and recovery in the community. 

Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, is generally considered the holiest day of the year in Judiasm. Years ago, it was a day that might have gone by unnoticed by poet DeWitt Clinton, who was raised a Methodist in Kansas. 

Doors-Open-Milwaukee-2018
Mitch Teich

More than 170 Milwaukee area buildings will open their doors to tourists this weekend. Historic Milwaukee’s annual Doors Open Milwaukee event also includes more than 30 tours of historic or otherwise notable places that the public can’t always access.

Scott Walker/YouTube, Tony Evers/YouTube

Election day is more than six weeks away, but one thing is almost assured: the war of attack ads will continue to heat up in the coming days. And that’s where we start our Informed Voter series  — a collaboration between WUWM and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel to answer questions texted to us from potential Wisconsin voters.

Beatrice in Washington County wants to know:

Mitch Teich

The display of remarkable sculptures along Wisconsin Avenue in downtown Milwaukee will wrap up Sculpture Milwaukee's second season in October. While residents and visitors alike can take a self-guided tour of the art, the complimentary Sculpture Milwaukee lecture series adds even more depth to the outdoor sculpture exhibit.

Пресс-служба Президента Российской Федерации / Wikimedia

The former chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, Paul Manafort, agreed on Friday to cooperate with special prosecutor Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in U.S. elections. It remains unknown how that will shape Mueller's investigation, but the decision sent shock waves through Washington and beyond.

It’s not the only recent news involving Russia, which is embroiled in a long-running espionage controversy with the United Kingdom.

Andy Dean / Fotolia

Oral arguments were heard this week in a court case challenging some of what’s left of the Affordable Care Act. Wisconsin is among the plaintiffs in the case. Meanwhile, health care may prove to be an interesting balancing act for candidates in the upcoming midterm elections.

Mount Mary University photo

The latest act in Donna Ricco’s career has been underway for a few months now.  The Milwaukee native co-founded and went on to success with her eponymously named dress company.  After selling the company, Ricco took a few years away from the field, but this summer returned to her alma mater, Mount Mary University.

Michelle Matternowski

The conversation surrounding criminal justice reform in Wisconsin has the community crossing party lines to talk about solutions.

The Across the Red & Blue Divide event, which took place in Glendale on Sept. 6, included a panel discussion and small group discussion circles.

Junior Hansen Jr.

While there are aspects of the news coming out of Washington that sound like satire, it’s hard to be sure. With Will Durst, an award-winning political satirist and Milwaukee native, you can be sure it's satire. Though he now lives in California’s Bay Area, Durst is back in his home state for shows in Madison and Milwaukee before touring in Europe.

"I know what you're going to ask and I don't know!" Durst says right off the bat. "I've heard that people are so tired of hearing about Trump, I've heard that people can't get enough of Trump."

Michelle Maternowski

The latest episode of the Pretzel Podcast is an international epic, as Mitch and Michelle talk with a German master pastry chef. She tells them about the German Pretzel Diploma program at an upcoming trade show in Germany, but also sparks an existential crisis that requires a philosopher to resolve. And on crunch time, they try pretzels made of spelt and cauliflower, and hopefully live to tell the tale.

Penguin Random House

It’s Tuesday already, but there are more than a few Packers fans still basking in the glow of their comeback victory over Chicago on Sunday night. Many of those same fans were expressing their disgust with the Packers leadership halfway through the game, when the score was lopsided in favor of the Bears.

That's football. But it’s also like politics — we support our leaders when we agree with them and want to throw the bums out when we don’t. The intersection between professional football and politics is pretty substantial, as Mark Leibovich learned over the past few years.

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