art

Mitch Teich

The display of remarkable sculptures along Wisconsin Avenue in downtown Milwaukee will wrap up Sculpture Milwaukee's second season in October. While residents and visitors alike can take a self-guided tour of the art, the complimentary Sculpture Milwaukee lecture series adds even more depth to the outdoor sculpture exhibit.

Kevin J. Miyazaki / Sculpture Milwaukee

Sculpture Milwaukee is a month away from wrapping up its second year of art installations along Wisconsin Avenue.  This year, it was bracketed on one end by Robert Indiana’s iconic Love sculpture on the east and Ana Prvacka’s Stealing Shadows, Michelangelo to the west.

JoAnna Bautch, Latino Arts

Alberto Villalobos is probably best known for his music. He's one-third of the ensemble Villalobos Brothers, an ensemble that performs traditional Mexican music with a contemporary flair. He's also a visual artist, working in oils, papier-mâché, and clay.

lapandr / Fotolia

It’s virtually fall in Milwaukee. And that means the area’s arts organizations have started new seasons. There are big titles and some lesser-known ones on offer, from concerts at the new Fiserv Forum to small gallery shows.

Milwaukee Magazine previews the fall arts season from the theater, arts and entertainment scenes in its current issue.

MIAD

Milwaukee is awash in the sound of motorcycle engines this weekend. Riders from around the world have gathered here to celebrate Harley-Davidson’s 115th anniversary. It’s an event that the late artist Mathew Hintz would have loved.

Hintz graduated from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design in the late 1990s, and in 1998 received a styling and graphic design internship with Harley-Davidson.

Traveling Lemur Productions

Many Milwaukee theatregoers have seen Angela Iannone act on local stages over the years. She is a talented, passionate, and consummate artist. And she brings those same qualities to her playwriting. Theatre Red’s production of her play, "This Prison Where I Live," is currently on stage at the theatre space in the Big Red Church on 10th Street and Wisconsin Avenue.

Kwasniewski, Roman B.J./Roman Kwasniewski Photographs, UWM Archives; Marc Tasman

Look Here! is a collaboration between the UWM Libraries and artists from RedLine Milwaukee and the UWM Peck School of the Arts. It was two years in the research and making, and was installed at the Villa Terrace Museum on Milwaukee’s east side earlier this summer.

leaf-bowl-ceramic-art-jean-wells
Neil Estrick

The Morning Glory Fine Craft Fair takes place on the Marcus Center grounds Aug. 11-12. It’s the signature event of the Wisconsin Designer Crafts Council — an organization started in Milwaukee more than 100 years ago to help foster excellence in the fine craft community across the state.

Photo Courtesy of David J. Wagner, L.L.C.

Most art curators work for museums and tend to have substantial academic credentials in art history and museum studies. David Wagner is not an art historian. His academic background is in musical performance and arts administration. But he is a curator.

Wagner’s Milwaukee-based business, David J Wagner LLC, produces and manages traveling exhibitions for museums and other cultural and scientific institutions in North America and abroad. 

SUMMIT PLAYERS THEATRE / FACEBOOK.COM

For local Bard enthusiasts, summertime means a full slate of Shakespeare in parks throughout Wisconsin, thanks to the Summit Players. The Milwaukee-based troupe has been performing Shakespearian plays at an ever-growing roster of Wisconsin State Parks for four seasons.

Mohamed Amin

It’s hard to overstate what a prolific photojournalist Mohamed Amin was in his relatively short life. When the Kenyan native died in 1996, he left behind 2.5 million still photographs and more than 5,000 hours of raw video, shot during his 33-year career. Until now, almost none of that work has been displayed in the United States.

Cory Trepanier / Facebook

There are parts of our planet where most of us will never have the opportunity to travel. But thanks to people like Cory Trepanier, we still have the opportunity to see them.

Grohmann Museum / facebook.com

Wallace Abbey captured images of trains and how railroads played a role in shaping large cities for decades, beginning in the 1940s.  And in doing that, the late photographer chronicled not just how the railroad industry changed over 70 years, but how our culture shifted.

Abbey, who died in 2014, was a longtime Milwaukee-based photographer and an editor at Trains magazine in the 1950s.

Mitch Teich

The concept is pretty simple - two wheels, pedals, a chain, and a frame.  But within that basic mix of parts, it turns out there’s a lot of room for art.  Quite a lot of room, actually. Even a basic bike can be a work of art - art that can also take you to work, or down a wooded path.

courtesy Paul Noth

Cartoonist and Milwaukee native Paul Noth has typically created work for older audiences - animated shorts on "Saturday Night Live," a short video series with Jim Gaffigan and Conan O'Brien, cartoons in The New Yorker and The Wall Street Journal.  But his latest work is the first in a trilogy of books for middle-grade readers, called How To Sell Your Family to the Aliens.

Noth returned to Milwaukee to share the story of his journey from Rufus King High School to the many creative outlets that fill his professional career.

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