Emily R Files

How Did Milwaukee End Up With So Many Public Montessori Schools?

In many places across the United States, families looking for Montessori education turn to private schools. But Milwaukee is different. There are eight free, public Montessori schools in the district.

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Early in Milwaukee’s history, residents flocked to the Milwaukee River to recreate. They gathered at the beer gardens and swimming schools that lined the shores, north of downtown.

By the end of the 1900s however, development and runoff had polluted the river, and the community began abandoning it. It wasn’t until about 1970 that comprehensive efforts began to remediate the problems.

The river is far from its pristine state. Yet in today’s installment of our series Milwaukee River Revival, WUWM’s Ann-Elise Henzl views how the river has again become a draw for leisure-time activities.

It's been a little more than a month since Wisconsin's historic gubernatorial recall election. And while the state’s political rhetoric has finally begun to die down, even if the partisanship hasn't, national politics are just heating up. The country is still processing the landmark Supreme Court ruling upholding the Affordable Care Act, President Obama's signature health care reform law, although Governor Scott Walker has said he will not implement any health care changes until after the November election.

Businesses Benefit From Views, Traffic, Energy

Jul 19, 2012

All week we’ve been taking a close look at the Milwaukee River. We heard about the waterway’s history – how the community used it decades ago for industry and transportation – to modern developments, such as luxury condominiums and trendy restaurants. Today, WUWM’s Erin Toner reports on the value of the Milwaukee River to downtown businesses.

Housing units and more have popped up along the Milwaukee River in recent times, as the city has accommodated development. For decades, the community polluted, then ignored the festering water. However, in contemporary times, there have been multi-pronged efforts to rehabilitate the resource. In today’s installment of our series, Milwaukee River Revival, WUWM’s Marti Mikkelson reports on the growth of eateries and watering holes. Quite a few have boating docks.

Wisconsin DNR

The Wisconsin Natural Resources Board voted unanimously yesterday afternoon to adopt the DNR’s recommendations for Wisconsin’s first wolf hunt. The rules the Board set down include a kill quota of 201 wolves, which were recently delisted from Endangered Species Act. The hunt will run from October to February.

The hunt has been controversial enough that more than a hundred people jammed the hearing room in Stevens Point where the Board was meeting, and some 40-plus people testified during the hearing.

Before the economic downturn of the last decade, housing development – and sales, along Milwaukee’s downtown river were booming. The administration of former Mayor John Norquist and civic leaders at the time championed the resurgence of the historic corridor. It had decayed and people ignored the river. In Tuesday’s installment of our series, Milwaukee River Revival, WUWM’s LaToya Dennis reports that much to the delight of realtors, developers and local leaders, waterfront properties are again moving off the market.

The grey wolf is in Wisconsin’s spotlight.

Shortly after the federal government removed the animal from the endangered species list, the state created a wolf hunt to begin this October.

With little time to spare, the DNR designed rules for the first season.

The agency is proposing a harvest of 201 wolves, with some zones more heavily targeted than others.

Tuesday the seven-member Natural Resources Board will vote on the DNR’s proposed rules at a special meeting in Stevens Point.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence looks at the polarizing positions the wolf – and its upcoming hunt – are raising.

Farmers in southeastern Wisconsin are wondering just how bad this growing season will be – or what might be salvageable. The drought in southern Wisconsin last week intensified from moderate to severe. WUWM’s LaToya Dennis visited Rob -N-Cin’s Farm in West Bend.The family-owned farm tends around 400 dairy cows and raises crops - alfalfa, corn, soybeans and winter wheat. Son Rick Roden fears this season could be devastating.

The City of Milwaukee has joined a club of which no community wants to be a member.

Late last week, officials announced that the Emerald ash borer has infected trees on the city’s northwest side.

WUWM Environmental Reporter Susan Bence met a city forester on the site to learn how Milwaukee has been preparing for the pest.

It has already taken down tens of millions of trees in states to our east as well as in Canada.

Along the Milwaukee River, Optimism Abounds

Jul 16, 2012
Wiki Commons

All this week, WUWM News is exploring recent efforts to revitalize what was once a key thoroughfare through the city, but one which fell into decline decades ago. The Milwaukee River once was the catalyst for commerce and industry during the city's formative years and also provided recreation for the people who moved here. However, disregard for the river's health led to decades of decay.

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