Audrey Nowakowski

Lake Effect Producer

Audrey is a producer for Lake Effect. She is involved with every aspect of the show - from conducting interviews to editing audio to posting web stories and mixing the show together.

Her regular segments include Fit For You and film discussions. Before becoming a full-time producer, Audrey interned for Lake Effect starting in 2014 and joined the team full-time in the spring of 2015.

Audrey is a graduate of Cardinal Stritch University where she majored in Communication Arts and minored in History and English. She has also worked with 91.7 WMSE producing public service announcements.

Ways to Connect

Michael B. Thomas / Getty Images

Wisconsin is known for having some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the nation. Currently, women can only go to four clinics in the state to access abortion services. If they can get appointments at these clinics, additional restrictions such as state-directed counseling and a 24-hour waiting period require multiple trips.

Magnolia Pictures

If you turn on Netflix, the top 10 films during the international Black Lives Matter protests following the killing of George Floyd include movies like The Help, Greenbook, or Crash. But these films aren't necessarily the ones to watch to learn more about race issues and racism.

While films are a powerful medium and a widely accessible tool, it’s important to watch films that give accurate representations of events and are made by voices of color — whether fiction or documentaries.

Ben Frawley

Civil rights protesters continue to march around the country and in Milwaukee against police brutality since the death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer.

The way many people are connecting with the demonstrations is through the videos and photographs from people on the ground. At WUWM, our reporters have been aided by local photographer and videographer Samer Ghani, who has been out at the protests nearly every day working to capture what’s been happening in our city.

Milwaukee County Historical Society

Throughout United States history, Milwaukee and Wisconsin have been politically significant. And Milwaukee has an interesting political past you may not know about: socialists ran the city for nearly half of the 20th century. One of the most notable was Mayor Daniel Hoan, who served for a consecutive 24 years — the longest socialist administration in U.S. history.

Vincent Desjardins / Flickr

Protests continue to happen around the country following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck and a black woman named Breonna Taylor was shot several times in her bed in Louisville.

Courtesy of Milwaukee County Zoo

Updated June 8 at 1:02 p.m. CT

Milwaukee County Zoo will reopen on June 18 after being closed since mid-March due to the coronavirus. But it's not all back to normal, as phase one will require people to purchase tickets online and have other restrictions in place.

Wikimedia Commons

"Uh-oh, SpaghettiOs!"

Even if it's been years since you’ve tasted SpaghettiOs, the jingle is probably ingrained in your brain. It was 55 years ago this month that the famous “neat, round spaghetti you can eat with a spoon” hit the shelves. And it’s all thanks to Donald Goerke, a Waukesha native and UW-Madison graduate.

ParinPIX / stock.adobe.com

Medical error is the third leading cause of death in America, with more than 200,000 people dying unnecessarily each year. And the coronavirus pandemic has highlighted both patient and caregiver safety.

Bill Pugliano / Getty Images

Since the coronavirus outbreak began, sales of new cars across the country are down significantly. Auto manufacturing has been hindered by disruptions in the supply chain, and some plants have shut down.

Despite low interest rates and new safety precautions at dealerships, it may not be enough to encourage people to buy a new car, especially since consumer spending is down. Plus, with many of us working from home, we’re spending even less time in our cars.

Photograph by L Calçada / European Southern Observatory

While 1,000 light-years may seem like a vast distance away from Earth, it’s practically in our backyard because of the scale of the universe. And it’s just 1,000 light-years away from Earth where astronomers found the closest black hole to the Earth in the double-star system HR 6819

Illustration by Daniel Wiseman / Chronicle Books

If you're home with kids, you've probably been reading a lot of books together. A new book from a Madison-based children's author could be a good next read for everyone in your flock.

Stuart Franklin / Getty Images

Restaurants put $225 billion into the economy every year. While some are still in business, almost 450,000 independent restaurants must change operations to meet new safety measures or face the risk of closing completely due to the coronavirus pandemic. This will also impact the 11 million food service jobs — most of which were part of the initial flood of unemployment applications. 

>>Latest WUWM & NPR Coronavirus Coverage

LoloStock / stock.adobe.com

History is happening every day, and it’s not just recorded by people in power. The coronavirus pandemic is a huge moment in our collective history happening to all of us and it’s important that people in the future can learn about our experiences. There's no better way to do that than through first-hand accounts.

Misha Friedman / Getty Images

Many health care workers risk their physical and mental health to do their jobs. The coronavirus pandemic has intensified these challenges.

Just last month, emergency department medical director Dr. Lorna M. Breen committed suicide. Her family cites her work helping COVID-19 patients as the reason.

Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Outbreaks in the meat industry aren't new. In the early '90s, mad cow disease was a trade problem that affected the entire industry, halting the sale of beef worldwide. Then a large outbreak of bird flu in early 2013 was a pathogenic problem that led to thousands of birds being euthanized.

Coronavirus is a different challenge for the meat industry since it affects plants' high concentration of workers. Some meat plants have about 1,200 workers, and they're at greater risk of getting COVID-19 because they're often standing elbow-to-elbow while working.

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