Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Before coming to Milwaukee's NPR, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

Random House / Brown Books for Young Readers / Beacon Press

Right now, many of us are engaging in conversations about race and systemic racism in the United States. In some ways, it’s a conversation our country has been having for generations. But our nation’s legacy of racial injustice is often obscured by the books we read in school. That’s left some people to ask: how can I learn more?

The answer: more books.

Courtesy of Gothic Milwaukee

As businesses continue to reopen during the coronavirus pandemic, there are still concerns about how to do it safely. For most places, that means limiting the number of people allowed inside at one time, spacing out tables, and taping down socially distant spots to stand in line. But that can be a bit tricky when your business model depends on going in and out of other businesses, surrounded by a crowd of people. 

ink drop / stock.adobe.com

Over the last couple of decades, the gender pay gap has been narrowing nationwide. But it still remains a very real problem. A new report from the Wisconsin Policy Forum finds that women make around 85 cents for every dollar that a man makes in Milwaukee County. In Waukesha County, it’s just 76 cents to every dollar made by a man.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Journal

The recent protests in Milwaukee have drawn a lot of comparisons with the Civil Rights protests in the 1960s. Most notably, activists marched for 200 consecutive nights from 1967 to 1968 to protest the city’s fair housing standards.

VH1

Since the pandemic began, many of us have been glued to our couches binge-watching TV. And for fans of RuPaul’s Drag Race it’s been a good time to be stuck at home. The series, which features a cast of drag queens competing for the title of “America’s Next Drag Superstar,” premiered its 12th season as shutdowns began to sweep through American cities.

Kamil Krzaczynski / Getty Images

Lake Effect's Joy Powers talks with Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett about protests, policing, COVID-19 response and the upcoming Democratic National Convention.

We’re only halfway into 2020, and already Milwaukee has faced so many surprising and extraordinary challenges. A global pandemic shut down businesses, kept our communities in isolation, and brought the economy to a screeching halt. 

Joy Powers

The demonstrations erupting in cities around the country have brought thousands of people into the streets. They’re chanting, singing, and shouting in protest of police brutality. And as each word is articulated, they’re spreading minuscule water droplets into the air.

That’s a problem. Our communities are still in the middle of a global coronavirus pandemic, and many people are still being infected. So how can people demonstrate while maintaining their safety?

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and Historic Photo Collection / Milwaukee Public Library

Every month, Adam Carr from the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service joins us to talk about some of the community events that generally happen in Milwaukee. But this month, like seemingly every month lately, is different.

Milwaukeeans have been marching and protesting in neighborhoods throughout the city, calling for racial justice and an end to police brutality, among other social reforms. We’re also still in the middle of a global pandemic, which has many people stuck in their homes. 

Joy Powers

Milwaukee is no stranger to civil rights protests. The city’s open housing marches have become the stuff of legend. For 200 consecutive nights, demonstrators marched from Milwaukee’s predominantly black north side to the predominantly white south side. 

Space Raft, Lauryl Sulfate & Her Ladies Of Leisure, Yum Yum Cult, L'Resort

Despite the coronavirus pandemic and the cancellation of most live shows, Milwaukee bands continue to release new songs. And Matt Wild has listened to most of them.

Wild is one of the co-founders of Milwaukee Record, which describes itself as an online source for music, culture, and gentle sarcasm. Among the many cultural things Milwaukee Record keeps track of is a nearly exhaustive list of new music from local musicians.

justyna / stock.adobe.com

Working from home has been met with mixed reviews from people who’ve had to do it during the COVID-19 pandemic. But for most pets, this time has been a bonanza of extra petting, treats, and time with the people they love.

But now that businesses are opening up and people are returning to their places of work, how will these pets respond?

James Steakley / Wikimedia Commons

It finally feels like spring outside, which can only mean one thing: rain. The Milwaukee area has been hit with some torrential downpours, leading to flooded yards and, even worse, flooded basements.

But there are some ways to manage water through gardening. These techniques can improve drainage in your yard and also lead water away from the foundation of your home, keeping your basement dry.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

Late last year, police officers were called to Estabrook Park when gunshots were heard. When they got there, they found a lot more than a few guns. They found Geoffrey Graff, the man who would become infamous for building two bunkers along the Milwaukee River, where he’d lived for 15 years.

Alesandra Tejeda

As many Wisconsinites continue to work from home, the future of office buildings could be very different from how we left them.

Like many of you, the Lake Effect team has been working from home the past few months. And while we sit at our kitchen tables, couches or closets, our office building is relatively dormant, leaving our cubicles and offices empty. While the transition has been difficult for some employees, some people and companies hope to make working from home a permanent solution.

CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES

When the Democratic National Convention (DNC) first announced it would be coming to Milwaukee, there was a lot of hope for what it would bring to the city. Now, the future of the convention is unclear.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made large gatherings risky. And while the Democratic National Committee has pushed the date of the convention to August, it seems almost certain that we’ll still be dealing with this pandemic in some form.

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