Joy Powers

Lake Effect Producer

Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as a producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.

Joy grew up in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she started off her career in radio as an intern at WLKG-fm, The Lake. She has worked as an intern with several companies, including SiriusXm, Fujisankei Communications and the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. At SiriusXM, she was a programming intern and helped launch Studio54 Radio.

She earned a bachelors degree in broadcast journalism from Emerson College, Boston, where she worked with several radio and television stations. She was the public affairs director at WERS-fm, and produced the station’s AP-Award Winning program, You Are Here.

» Twitter: @thejoypowers

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The term millennial is thrown around so frequently that many may not know who is and isn't a millennial. It's used pretty generally to mean a young person, and it doesn't really have a strict definition, which has been confusing for some. 

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It’s graduation season, which also means it’s the season of commencement speeches. A time when celebrities take the stage, armed with jokes and wisdom for millions of young people entering the workforce.

Lynne Bergschultz

Author Cari Taylor-Carlson really knows the meaning of “faking it till’ you make it.” The former suburban housewife turned wilderness guide, spent a lot of time smiling through the fear as she started her outdoor touring business, Venture West.

Mattie Hagedorn / Flickr

If you’re trying to eat healthier, you might find yourself switching out butter for olive oil. Many believe that plant-based fats, rich in linoelic acid, are healthier than saturated fats like lard or butter. Saturated fats raise your cholesterol, and that supposedly raises your risk of dying from a heart attack. 

The Memory Palace

Host Nate Dimeo is bringing his popular history podcast, The Memory Palace, to life on stage at the Colectivo

Henry Holt Books for Young Readers

Most of us live our lives based on some assumptions. We think we know where we came from, and we believe that says something about who we are. But what happens when you find your life is based on a lie? What do you do, and who do you become?

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There are currently thousands of police officers working in U.S. schools, but there are almost no state or federal laws that require them to undergo special training to work with students.

Police officers are increasingly being used to discipline students in the classroom, and infractions that once sent kids to the principal's office are now landing them in handcuffs. 

The Art of Lasagna Gardening

May 6, 2016
J.H. Fearless / Flickr

It's growing season, and eager gardeners are already starting their plants for the summer. The promise of fresh fruits and vegetables is what keeps people coming back to their garden plots. But gardening is messy business, and setting up your garden can be strenuous. For many, the worst part is preparing the soil. It's a painstaking process of digging and tilling, which can feel arduous and unrewarding. 

Gardening contributor, Melinda Myers, knows this all too well. That's why she suggests something called, "lasagna gardening." 

Adam Ryan Morris / Milwaukee Magazine

When Making a Murderer premiered on Netflix last December, it entranced viewers and quickly became a household name. The ten part docuseries follows the real-life story of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who was falsely accused of a brutal rape and attempted murder, then charged and convicted of murdering another woman. The series shocked the nation with its in-depth look at how the homicide case was handled in Manitowoc County.

TKWA URBANLAB

Earlier this week, the new owners of the Shops of Grand Avenue unveiled their plan to redesign the space in downtown Milwaukee. Plans include adding office space, a possible grocery store and moving restaurants and food stalls into the first floor. They hope the new plans will revitalize the urban mall, which has faced a laundry list of problems over the last decade.

Judy Schmidt / Flickr

Explaining complex concepts or theories to a general audience can be tricky. It's a problem many experts face when trying to describe their work. How do you explain it in a way that makes it understandable, without dumbing it down? 

Longtime Lake Effect contributor Jean Creighton is pretty good at doing that when it comes to astronomy. Not only does she help visitors at the Manfred Olson Planetarium, she's also been helping the Lake Effect team understand how the universe works for almost a decade and.

ebru / Flickr

It’s no secret that fast food is probably not the best choice if you’re concerned about fat, salt or the origins of the meat or dairy products. If that weren’t enough, new research shows you may be ingesting more than your recommended daily allowance of hormone disruptors, along with your side of fries.

A new study published by Environmental Health Perspectives found people who frequently eat fast food have nearly 40% more phthalates in their blood than those who eat less or no fast food. So what are phthalates? 

Wyatt Massey

In a two-part series on the ongoing risk of lead poisoning in Milwaukee, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service reports on how diminished federal funding for lead-abatement efforts prompted the City to limit subsidies to six North Side ZIP codes, leaving owners of old homes in other neighborhoods scrambling for help. The series also looks at how Sixteenth Street Community Health Centers responds to elevated blood lead levels in children on the South Side. 

DFID / Flickr

Women in the world are at an unparalleled point in history for political power. In this country, there is a strong likelihood that Hillary Clinton will be the Democrats’ nominee for President this fall. Four of the past eight winners of the Nobel Peace Prize have been women, including Malala Yousafzai, the youngest-ever winner of the award.

Ian Sane / Flickr

Katie Gnau recently moved to Shorewood from Chicago. And when her daughter came home from school one day, Katie noticed she had picked up a new word for a familiar item. So, she asked WUWM's Bubbler Talk:  Why does everyone around here call that a Bubbler, anyway?

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