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How Micro Weddings Give Couples More Personalization And Time With Guests At Their Celebration

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Micro weddings may be a larger part of the future of weddings as they provide a more intimate and personalized celebration.

Micro weddings or weddings with under 75 guests were growing in popularity even before gathering limits were put in place due to the pandemic. While traditional, big weddings are on hold as COVID-19 continues to devastate Wisconsin, celebrations will happen again one day.

With high costs and extra planning associated with long guest lists, micro weddings can be a way to create a more intimate feeling during your wedding celebration.

Kristin Reisenauer is the owner and lead planner of Natural Elegance, a full-service wedding boutique. She says while 75 is a number that could seem huge to some and small to others, the idea of a micro wedding is about the feeling the day has.

“Larger weddings, just like the size implies, often have a little bit more of a chaotic schedule, there’s so many people for the couple to see and spend time with during the day. The more intimate the wedding, more time the couple has to spend with all of their guests. The whole timeline and overall layout of the day is just a little bit more relaxed,” she says.

When planning a micro wedding, Reisenauer says couples can chose which traditions they want to keep and which to leave behind and that most traditions are able to scale with the size of the guest list.

“If there’s 20 people at a wedding versus 200, all 20 of your guests are guaranteed to see your first dance,” she says.

Something that can’t always be guaranteed at larger weddings.

Reisenauer says a big benefit of micro weddings is that everything can be customized to the couple’s personality.

“The overall guest experience can be a little bit more personalized to what the couple loves. So if they love, you know, a great seven course meal, tasting menu type food experience, that’s something that with a smaller wedding, might be more realistic,” she says.

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Joy Powers joined WUWM January 2016 as producer for Lake Effect. Most recently, she was a director and producer for The Afternoon Shift, on WBEZ-fm, Chicago Public Radio.