UWM Today

Airs Thursdays from 1:30 to 2 pm & Sundays from 7:30 to 8 pm

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee plays a vital role in shaping the future of Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Meet the people behind the creativity and discoveries at UW-Milwaukee on UWM Today.

On the first Thursday of every month, WUWM's Dave Edwards talks to UWM's Chancellor Mark Mone on the Chancellor's Report.

Ways to Connect

Emily Files

WUWM's John Hess chats with UWM Chancellor Mark Mone and special guests: Danae Davis, Milwaukee Succeeds Executive Director; Tim Sheey, president, Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce and Julia Taylor, president of the Greater Milwaukee Committee. They discuss how UWM and its partners in the Milwaukee area are dealing with the effects of COVID-19, and how they are creating plans to safely reopen the city. They will also address how the recent unrest in the city and surrounding communities are affecting UWM and Milwaukee’s rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic.

People over the age of 60 are some of the most at risk for COVID-19. Health experts are advising seniors to be extra careful about exposing themselves to infection by taking steps to social distance and even isolate themselves from people who are carriers of the disease. But the very measures meant to keep people from getting infected may be causing other health issues, like loneliness.

Emily Files

If you asked someone how to get to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee campus a couple of years ago, they'd steer you to the East side of Milwaukee, where the university has grown into one of the top research universities in the country. But today, directions to UWM also lead you to Waukesha and Washington counties. That’s where UWM’s two-year campuses are located, offering another dimension in learning to people in southeastern Wisconsin.

Get To Know WUWM General Manager John Hess

May 7, 2020

UW-Milwaukee Chancellor Mark Mone chats with WUWM General Manager John Hess, who joined the station in January. He is a 30 year veteran of the media industry, working in television, radio and newspapers throughout his career.

 

Emily Files

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted all of us in Wisconsin. But here in Milwaukee some members of our community have been particularly hard hit. Four Milwaukee ZIP codes show the highest incidence of infection — two are predominantly African American and two are Hispanic.

Emily Files

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to sicken thousands of Wisconsinites and kill hundreds, the physical threat to all of us is clear. The situation is also having a major impact on our emotions. Stay-at-home orders, layoffs, furloughs, home schooling, and isolation for many, they all add up to a huge disruption in the way we see the world and the way we feel about ourselves.

Jason Rieve

When the Democratic National Convention comes to Milwaukee this summer, the more than 50,000 attendees will see a very different downtown Milwaukee than they would have 10 years ago. It’s no secret that the city of Milwaukee has changed dramatically over the years, and that change continues today with hundreds of millions of dollars in new construction on the drawing boards.

Jason Rieve

If you're married and have children, you know how challenging it is to be a both a good partner and a good care giver to your kids. Imagine having to do that parenting on your own. That's the norm for many in America today where 40% of the babies are born to unwed parents.

Emily Files / WUWM

For the past few weeks, all of us have been living with the threat of the coronavirus pandemic. It has changed our way of life as we watch huge numbers of Americans, including members of our own community, fall ill and sadly, too often, die from the effects of the virus.

Jason Rieve

As this political year continues to heat up with claims and counterclaims about which candidates are best suited to represent us, it can all be a bit overwhelming. It seems like we were never as divided as we are today. So this week on UWM Today, we're pushing the pause button on the current political debates. We're going to take a little history lesson, looking back at a Wisconsin politician who was so popular with voters on both sides of the aisle that he didn’t even have to raise any money in his last two elections — and he still won handily. That politician?

Jason Rieve

While the winter weather is still going strong, that hasn’t stopped scientists at UW-Milwaukee from continuing their research on a big problem facing many of Wisconsin’s lakes: toxic algae. If you've driven by the lagoon at Milwaukee’s Veteran’s Park at the lakefront, you've probably seen the culprit up close. The blue-green algae has covered the southern part of the lagoon like a blanket — and the risk to anyone wading into that water is great.

Jason Rieve

There was once a time when flipping through the channels on your television during the day meant inevitably coming across soap operas. At one point, nearly 20 different daytime soaps were on the air. They were ubiquitous. Even if you weren’t a fan, it was impossible to miss them. Today, only four are left on the main broadcast networks, but the impact the programs have had on our culture is profound. 

Jason Rieve

Every year thousands of Americans die from drug overdoses. More than half of those deaths involve the use of opioids, which were created to help people deal with debilitating pain. Finding alternatives to opioids would literally be a lifesaver for many.

Jason Rieve

Keeping your weight under control is one of the guiding rules we hear from our doctors. For adults it can be a challenge. But for children, especially those with special needs, dealing with obesity can be particularly difficult.

On this edition of UWM Today, we meet an expert on child obesity. Michele Polfuss is an associate professor at UWM’s College of Nursing. She is leading a $3.6 million federal grant to investigate weight issues. Polfuss is also serving as the joint research chair in the nursing of children at both UWM and Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin.

Jason Rieve

With more than 27,000 students, UWM has grown into a top tier research university. While there are many points of pride within the institution, one area stands apart from the other programs: the Honors College. It’s a community of students and teachers devoted to excellence in learning. Just under 700 students are in the Honors College where the focus is on small classes with top professors from across the campus. In addition to outstanding academics, the Honors College also offers students a unique opportunity to put their education into practice with community service projects.  

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