achievement gap

Emily Files / WUWM

Protests sparked by police killings of Black people are drawing attention to the United States' persistent racial disparities. Those disparities are also widespread in education. Wisconsin has some of the largest test score and high school graduation gaps between Black and white students.

Emily Files

A new report from a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee researcher highlights one reason African American teachers may leave classrooms: trust issues in the work environment.

Emily Files

Wisconsin has the widest achievement gap between black and white students of any state based on results of a test known as the nation's report card.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress test results released Wednesday show no significant change from statewide results a decade ago. However, declining scores for the lowest performing students resulted in Wisconsin having the widest achievement gap of any state.

Wisconsin superintendent of schools Carolyn Stanford Taylor says the achievement gap is a crisis and closing the gaps is "imperative for our state."

Emily Files / WUWM

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction released standardized test results for public school students Thursday, and there’s not much to celebrate.

Students’ mastery of both English language arts and math declined compared to the previous year, with just about 40% of students proficient in each. Students were making progress in math previously, but that trend did not continue this year. English results have declined for a couple years.

Emily Files

Wisconsin has some of the most pronounced education gaps between black and white students. In 2012, a group of suburban Milwaukee school districts, along with Concordia University in Mequon, launched a collaboration to address those racial disparities — the Closing the Achievement Gap Consortium.

Courtesy Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

 

Carolyn Stanford Taylor is Wisconsin’s first African-American superintendent of schools. She was appointed last week by Gov. Tony Evers to take over his former job leading the Department of Public Instruction (DPI).

Stanford Taylor has firsthand experience with America’s deep-seated education inequities. As a 9-year-old, she was one the first black students to integrate schools in her hometown of Marks, Miss.

She says her mom posed the question to her and her siblings one day on the walk to school: do you want to go to the black school or the white school? 

Emily Files

New Wisconsin standardized test results for the 2017-18 school year were released this week. Statewide, there aren’t any dramatic changes from the last two years: Students’ math scores are inching up and reading scores have fallen slightly.

But the results are a reminder that just one in five Milwaukee students is proficient in reading and writing. And even fewer meet standards in math.

Emily Files

State education chief and gubernatorial hopeful Tony Evers wants to put an additional $1.4 billion into public education over the next two years. The proposal is part of the Department of Public Instruction’s request for the 2019-2021 state budget.

Evers, a Democrat, heads the agency as state superintendent. The spending plan comes in the middle of a tight race between Evers and incumbent Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican.

Michelle Maternowski

Updated December 23, 2016:

The Milwaukee School Board approved Thursday earlier start dates for all district high schools, International Baccalaureate and year-round schools for the 2017-18 academic year. 

It's one of several changes the district will pursue, as part of a rigorous reform agenda from Superintendent Darienne Driver.

LaToya Dennis

Books in barbershops are rolling-out in Milwaukee. It’s an effort to help close the city’s black white student achievement gap – one of the highest in the country. Organizers say it’s not what you read, only that you read.

There are a lot of things you might expect to find at a barbershop. The buzz of clippers, conversations about politics or community happenings, but not a library, that is, until now.

Apartment Learning Centers in Wisconsin Seek to Shrink Achievement Gap for Children & Adults

Feb 14, 2016
Abigail Becker / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

As a single mother living in poverty in a city known for its weak record of educating students of color, Kanesha Wingo realized her odds of finding success were slim. But with help from a learning center in her Milwaukee apartment complex, Wingo completed her college education, creating a foundation for herself and young daughter.

Wisconsin’s Black-White Achievement Gap Worst in Nation Despite Decades of Efforts

Dec 16, 2015
Abigail Becker / Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism

When Madison Memorial High School sophomore Demitrius Kigeya solves math problems in his head, other students give him surprised looks. He believes it is because he is black.

“I just pay attention in class and do my homework,” said Kigeya, 15.

Odoi Lassey, 16, a junior, echoed Kigeya’s feelings.

“People don’t expect you to know anything,” explained Lassey, who, like Kigeya, is a high academic performer, plays on the high school soccer team and is active in Memorial’s Black Student Union.

ktsdesign, fotolia

While 28 states across the country saw the gap between their black and white student graduation rates narrow, Wisconsin's grew.

According to preliminary date released by the U.S. Department of Education, the gap between the number of African American students who graduate from high school in four years compared to their white peers is the worst in the country.

Fuse

On Wednesday, a committee of educators will meet in Madison to begin looking for ways to close achievement gaps.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the “nation’s report card,” was released Thursday.