budget

Chuck Quirmbach

In an attempt to convince Wisconsin legislators to fund 15 additional crime lab positions — costing $1.8 million in state funds over the next two years — Attorney General Josh Kaul is touring Wisconsin State Crime Lab locations. During a visit Thursday to the lab on the south side of Milwaukee, Kaul was also urging support for a $1.9 million pay plan, which he says is needed to address pay disparities and inequities with comparable crime laboratories in the region. 

Chuck Quirmbach

The fate of proposed state building projects at UW-Milwaukee, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and other sites remains unclear. Republican lawmakers Wednesday blocked the Wisconsin Building Commission from recommending more than 80 projects wanted by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers. 

Usually, the building commission goes along with most or all of the projects recommended in what's known as the governor's capital budget. With that momentum, the Legislature's budget committee then later typically approves the commission's list. 

uwm-chemistry-building
Emily Files

In his proposed biennial capital budget, Gov. Tony Evers wants to spend $2.5 billion on public building projects. About half of that money would go to University of Wisconsin facilities, including a new $130 million chemistry building at UW-Milwaukee.

On Thursday, UW System President Ray Cross held a press conference to rally support for the proposed chemistry building replacement.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

President Trump's budget proposal for 2020 calls for $8.6 billion in new border wall funding, a signal that the White House is not backing away from a demand that triggered a 35-day government shutdown.

The border wall is just one flashpoint in the president's $4.7 trillion budget blueprint. Trump is also calling for a 5 percent boost in military spending along with deep cuts to domestic programs and foreign aid.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin Gov., and cancer survivor, Tony Evers defended his $2.5 billion capital budget proposal during a visit Friday to the Medical College of Wisconsin in Wauwatosa. 

Evers drew criticism from Republican leaders in the state Legislature after unveiling this week his two-year borrowing plan for state building projects. One lawmaker calls Evers' plan to roughly triple the last capital budget proposed by former Republican Gov. Scott Walker, "alarming."

But Evers maintains that the projects he wants built would help Wisconsin residents.

Emily Files

Tony Evers’ background is in education, including serving as the top education official in Wisconsin. Now that he is governor, Evers is proposing a raft of school funding changes. He delivered his first budget address on Feb. 28.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is now touring the state, highlighting the $83 billion state budget proposal he formally unveiled Thursday night. The tour comes as state Republicans continue to heavily criticize the plan from the Democratic governor.

One of Evers' stops on Friday was at a public school in Sturtevant, Schulte Elementary. There, he read to students and met with the news media.

Screenshot/Wisconsin Public Television

During his campaign for governor, Democrat Tony Evers pledged to increase the role of science in the Department of Natural Resources. That’s something that had diminished during the tenure of his Republican predecessor Scott Walker.

Evers also promoted renewable energy projects, saying they would both protect Wisconsin resources and boost economic development.

When he was sworn into office, Evers mentioned he would take the issue of global warming seriously.

Screenshot/Wisconsin Public Television

New Democratic Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers delivered his first biennial budget proposal to the Republican-controlled Legislature Thursday night. At issue is a multi-billion-dollar spending plan that affects nearly every person in Wisconsin. Evers has been unveiling many of the policy points over the past few weeks, on issues from education to the environment. Republican leaders are calling it a “liberal wish list.”

Phil Roeder/Flickr

Gov. Tony Evers wants to spend an additional $150 million on Wisconsin’s public universities and colleges in the next two years. Evers plans to announce the proposal as part of his biennial budget address Thursday night.

The new governor’s proposal is a departure from his predecessor, Republican Scott Walker. Walker cut funding for the UW System and limited the universities’ ability to raise revenue by imposing a tuition freeze for in-state students.

Angelina Mosher Salazar

Updated 5:40 p.m.

Gov. Tony Evers vetoed a Republican tax bill Wednesday. The bill, passed by the Republican-controlled Legislature last week, would have funded a middle-class income tax cut using surplus funds from the current state budget.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gov.-elect Tony Evers has named five more Cabinet appointees, most of whom would face sizable policy challenges in Southeastern Wisconsin. 

Evers has promised to try to expand federal Medicaid funding in Wisconsin, a move that could help cover thousands of more low-income people in the Milwaukee area. He says he also wants to help those with pre-existing medical conditions maintain their insurance coverage.

SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES

Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers and Lt. Gov.-elect Mandela Barnes held the final listening session in Milwaukee on Wednesday for what they are calling the people’s budget.

At least 100 people showed up for the listening session and were divided into groups that focused on criminal justice reform, health care and economic development among other things.

Milwaukee-wisconsin-budget
Lorie Shaull/Flickr

Policymakers in the city of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County are debating the merits of proposed budgets for the coming fiscal year and weighing legislative priorities with fiscal responsibility.

Every year, the Wisconsin Policy Forum scrutinizes these budget proposals and offers some analysis. This year is no exception. What is an exception is the relatively non-controversial nature of the proposals.

Justin Hofmann flickr

Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele presented his 2019 budget proposal to the Milwaukee County Board on Monday. It contains ideas on how to close a $23 million budget gap. Abele says among the ways to raise additional revenue is to allow camping in some county parks. He also wants to raise fees and bus fares.

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