budget

Shawn Johnson, Wisconsin Public Radio

Wisconsin lawmakers on Wednesday kicked off the first public hearing across the state on Gov. Walker’s proposed budget. At the forefront of concern were cuts to education and programs that serve seniors and people with disabilities.

The first public hearing on the proposed 2015-2017 state budget was held in Brillion--a small town in northeastern Wisconsin. For about seven hours straight, people filed up to one of two mics set up in the auditorium of the high school.

Marti Mikkelson

    

Several hundred people gathered at MATC in downtown Milwaukee Wednesday night to rally against Gov. Scott Walker’s cuts to public education.

The event coincided with a speech from former Assistant U. S. Education Secretary Diane Ravitch. She’s an outspoken opponent of voucher schools.

The rally served as a warm-up to Friday’s public hearing in Milwaukee on the proposed state budget.

S Bence

The University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee and its neighbors were shocked to learn  Gov. Walker’s biennial budget would remove state protections for Downer Woods, an 11-acre preserve on campus.

Vice Chancellor of University Relations and Communications Tom Luljak says UWM did not ask for the changes included in the governor's budget proposal. Leaders assume that the protections state law has provided for the woods would be transferred to the UW Board of Regents - UWM's governing body.

The Struggle To Save Long-Term Care

Mar 16, 2015
The Home of Fixers/Flickr

Battle lines are being drawn over portions of Governor Walker’s proposed budget for the coming two years. 

godfer - Fotolia.com

Gov. Walker’s proposed budget would change the way thousands of Wisconsin families get care for an elderly loved one, or a member with disabilities.

Paul Weimer, Flickr

  

There’s a chance your favorite state park could someday be “brought to you by” a private company.

Adelie Freyja Annabel, Flickr

At state university campuses around Wisconsin, department heads are going into budgeting processes contemplating cuts that could be as small as five percent or as large as 20 percent – or more.

Walker Budget Cuts State Parks Funding, Raises Fees

Feb 17, 2015
Paul Weimer, Flickr

Wisconsin's state parks would become more self-sustaining, under Gov. Walker's proposed 2015-2017 budget.

LaToya Dennis

People upset over Governor Walker’s proposed budget cuts to education took to the streets Monday afternoon for a rally and march that ended in front of the governor’s home.

Whitney Curtis - Getty Images

Public school supporters swarmed the streets around Gov. Walker’s home in Wauwatosa Monday. The demonstrators are upset with his proposed budget, which would reduce K12 school aid by nearly $130 million next year.

Gov. Scott Walker
Alex Wong/Getty Images

One observer says presidential hopefuls might raise the issue, thinking it could hurt Gov. Walker in polls. Another stunned that Wisconsin is talking cuts.

S Bence

Land trust supporters sounded the alarm as Gov. Walker released his budget. It calls for a moratorium on the Knowles-Nelson Stewardship Program.

S Bence

Walker's budget would freeze the state’s stewardship program designed to conserve land and unique habitats; and would cut back the DNR's science staff.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Gov. Walker said Thursday that he's willing to add more money in the next state budget for the UW System, public schools and transportation, according to the Associated Press.

His caveat is that the state must still lowers property taxes.

Under the 2015-2017 plan he submitted to the Legislature Tuesday night, property taxes would drop $10 on the average home.

Center for Media and Democracy

UPDATE: Gov. Walker's office now says he will not change the mission of the UW System.

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