Capitol Notes

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Gov. Scott Walker conceded to Democratic challenger Tony Evers Wednesday after Evers won the election by just more than 1 percentage point. Walker originally wanted to wait until military ballots were counted and the official canvass was completed. He also expressed concern about 2,000 absentee ballots in Milwaukee that were reconstructed due to errors or damage.

After weeks of attack ads and mailings, the candidates for Wisconsin governor and U.S. Senate spent the weekend barnstorming the state, making their final appeals to voters before Tuesday's election.

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, what points the candidates wanted to hammer home, in their closing arguments.

Gov. Scott Walker and his Democratic challenger Tony Evers squared off for their second and final debate Friday night before the Nov. 6 election. The candidates debated health care, education, immigration and the economy — and repeated the same arguments they've consistently made throughout the campaign.  

Walker and Evers are locked in a tight race, with roughly a week to go until the election. In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com whether he thinks the candidates were able to sway voters with their arguments.

Gov. Scott Walker and his Democratic challenger Tony Evers, traded barbs in their first debate Friday night over taxes, health care and education. But, the candidates also found themselves addressing some bombshells that dropped earlier in the week.  

Last week saw two debates between Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican challenger Leah Vukmir. Both debates were characterized by tension and hostility as the two clashed over abortion, immigration, health care and a host of other issues. 

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com why he thought the debates were so combative. 

Althouse

After a bitter fight that culminated in sexual assault accusations and an FBI investigation, Judge Brett Kavanaugh is now Justice Kavanaugh. The U.S. Senate confirmed Kavanaugh over the weekend and he was then sworn in to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Wisconsin's U.S. senators split on the matter, with Republican Ron Johnson voting yes and Democrat Tammy Baldwin voting no to confirmation. In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, whether those votes will come back to haunt the two senators.   

The Kavanaugh hearings took center stage last week in Washington, and both candidates is Wisconsin's U.S. Senate race weighed in on President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court. 

Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin asked for an FBI investigation into claims that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a woman when the two were teenagers. Baldwin's Republican challenger Leah Vukmir, meanwhile, called for quick confirmation of Kavanaugh.  

The candidates for governor traded more barbs last week. State School Superintendent and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers took the opportunity to criticize his opponent, Republican Gov. Scott Walker, in his "state of education" address. Evers said Walker's education priorities are "out of whack" and that his policies are failing Wisconsin.

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Gov. Scott Walker is imploring state senators to return to the capitol, and vote on a bill that would provide $100 million in tax incentives to Kimberly-Clark. The company says it will close one of its plants in the Fox Valley if the Senate doesn't approve the incentives by the end of the month. 

Althouse

Last week, we saw Republican Gov. Scott Walker inserting himself into the national anthem debate. He called on all NFL players to stand during the anthem, instead of taking a knee. In doing so, Walker sided with President Trump, who's been vocal on the issue. 

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Some heavy hitters are beginning to appear in Wisconsin on behalf of the candidates this fall. Vice President Mike Pence held a fundraiser in Milwaukee last week for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Leah Vukmir. She's facing Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin in November.

Pence says both he — and President Trump — plan on coming back to Wisconsin to rally for Vukmir and Gov. Walker before the mid-term elections. Walker is locked in a tight race with Democratic challenger Tony Evers.

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The underlying theme of the midterm elections this fall is how voters feel about Donald Trump.

The president has been on a bumpy road in the past week. Two of his former close associates were found guilty. Others turned against him, agreeing to share potentially damaging information.

It’s been less than a week since the fall primary elections and already campaigns are in “full-court press” mode. The candidates in the big races have been traveling the state, courting voters.

Meanwhile, groups that favor Republican Gov. Scott Walker have been attacking Democratic challenger Tony Evers. And fans of Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin have been blasting GOP opponent Leah Vukmir.

Republican Gov. Scott Walker will face state School Superintendent Tony Evers in November, as a result of Tuesday's Democratic primary. The attacks happened immediately. The Republican Party of Wisconsin announced on election night that it would run TV ads, attacking Evers for not revoking the license of a teacher who viewed pornography on a state computer. Evers responded by saying that state law at the time wouldn't allow him to revoke the license, because students did not see the pornographic materials. 

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Tuesday is Wisconsin's fall primary election.  Among the races on the ballot is the Republican primary for U.S. Senate.  Voters will decide which candidate should take on Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin in November.  

The two front-runners in the primary are state Sen. Leah Vukmir of Brookfield, and Delafield business exec Kevin Nicholson.  The race between Vukmir and Nicholson has been marked by bitterness.  WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, why that's been the case, in this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation.  

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The Wisconsin governor's race is starting to draw broader attention.  Some recent national polls show Democratic candidate Tony Evers ahead of Republican Gov. Scott Walker in hypothetical head-to-head matchups. 

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Wisconsin voters had a chance last week to vet the Republican candidates for U.S. Senate.  State Sen. Leah Vukmir and Delafield Business Executive Kevin Nicholson debated issues such as tariffs, abortion and immigration policy, at a forum in Milwaukee.

In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked Jeff Mayers of WisPolitics.com, what he found interesting about the exchange.

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Gov. Scott Walker spent much of last week trying to downplay some photos that surfaced, of him and the woman now charged in an alleged Russian plot to interfere with U.S. elections.  The photos were snapped in 2015, as Walker was announcing his presidential bid. 

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, whether this will be problematic for Walker, as he seeks reelection this fall.

WUWM

The eight Democrats vying for the chance to take on Gov. Walker this fall shared the stage at UWM last week for their only broadcast debate, with just weeks to go until the Aug. 14 primary.

In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com what he found interesting about the discussion, and whether there was a clear winner.

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Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin's campaign could get a shot in the arm, as former presidential candidate and fellow U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders stumps for her in Eauu Claire this weekend.  Republicans are targeting Baldwin's seat in November and Sanders is considering another run for President himself in 2020.  In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, what it means for Baldwin to have a heavy hitter like "Bernie" rallying for her.

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The Foxconn groundbreaking last week on Foxconn's huge LCD screen factory in Racine County was a big deal for Gov. Scott Walker. He pushed hard for the Taiwanese electronics giant to locate the plant in Wisconsin. 

The day after the groundbreaking, Walker celebrated the news that Foxconn plans to create at least 200 jobs in Green Bay.  Those workers will develop applications for Foxconn's display screens.

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After months of anticipation, groundbreaking will be held Thursday on the huge Foxconn complex in Racine County.  And President Trump, who advocated for the Taiwanese electronics giant to locate in Wisconsin, will be on hand for the festivities. 

State and local governments committed $4.5 billion in tax incentives to land the massive LCD screen manufacturing plant, and it could create up to 13,000 jobs. 

Althouse

A group led by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder worked to elect Democrats in last week's special elections in Wisconsin.  One of the two open legislative seats went to a Democrat, while a Republican captured the other.  

Now, another big Democratic national organization is getting into the mix.  It's a group formed by former President Obama.  The organization says it's targeting Republican Gov. Scott Walker in November.  It's also trying to get a Democrat elected to the seat currently held by House Speaker Paul Ryan.

ALTHOUSE

Voters in De Pere, WI will select a new state senator Tuesday. Meanwhile, voters in Lodi will choose a new member of the Assembly. Special elections are being held to fill two vacancies.

Observers are wondering whether the elections could be a litmus test for the “blue wave” in Wisconsin, in this midterm election year.

Democrats are campaigning hard to win the seats, while Republicans are fighting just as hard to keep them.

Wispolitics.com Editor JR Ross talked about the special elections and other issues in this week’s Capitol Notes segment.

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The August primary elections are coming up quickly. Yet there's still no Democratic front-runner in the Democrats' bid to prevent Republican Gov. Scott Walker from winning another term in November.

The number of candidates is in the double digits. However, a few of them could be pulling ahead, according to a straw poll that WisPolitics.com conducted at last weekend's state Democratic Party convention.

Althouse

Hundreds of delegates are expected to gather in Oshkosh this weekend for the annual state Democratic Party convention.  This year's focus will be on the governor's race, as more than a dozen Democratic candidates have announced their intention to run against Republican incumbent Scott Walker in November.  But first, they'll have to get through a crowded Democratic primary in August.

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, just how fired up delegates at the convention will be.

The slate of candidates is set in special elections for two vacant seats in the state Legislature, after primaries last week.  Republican Jon Plumer advanced to take on Democrat Ann Groves-Lloyd for an Assembly post, north of Madison.  GOP state Rep. Andre Jacque will face Democrat Caleb Frostman, for a Green Bay area Senate seat.  

After weeks of suspense, U.S. Senate hopeful Leah Vukmir won the endorsement from delegates at the Wisconsin Republican Party convention over the weekend.  She snagged the party's backing from her opponent in the GOP primary -- Delafield businessman Kevin Nicholson.  The two are vying for the chance to face Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin in November.

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Republican U.S. Senate candidate Kevin Nicholson caused a stir last week, when he refused to apologize for remarks he made regarding veterans who support the Democratic Party.  A group of Republican veterans demanded an apology, after Nicholson told a local radio host he doesn't understand the "cognitive thought process" of democratic veterans.  

Althouse

The contest between the Republicans hoping to unseat Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin is getting ugly.  Sparks flew late last week, as state Sen. Leah Vukmir and political newcomer Kevin Nicholson met for their first debate.  

The two argued, when Nicholson accused Vukmir of not respecting his military experience.  Nicholson is a former Marine who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.  Vukmir accused Nicholson of dealing a low blow, and demanded an apology.

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