Capitol Notes

Gov. Scott Walker avoided the public eye in the week following the election, in which he narrowly lost to Democratic challenger Tony Evers. But late last week, he surfaced. 

He says he's open to moving the date of Wisconsin's presidential primary in 2020, so that it won't be held on the same day as the state Supreme Court election. The move would help conservative Justice Daniel Kelly, a Walker appointee who would be up for election to a 10-year term in April of 2020. 

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Update Nov. 16

 Gov. Scott Walker made his first comments to reporters on Thursday after losing his re-election bid. He promised he wouldn't "retreat." Walker also signaled potential support for a variety of Republican-backed efforts to limit the power of his Democratic successor, including moving the date of the 2020 presidential primary.

Original Story Nov. 12

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Last week, Tony Evers cleared a huge hurdle, winning the race for governor. But the Democrat’s biggest challenges are to come. The first is within a few months when Evers will have to present his first biennial budget proposal. According to a Wisconsin Policy Forum report, he'll have to find $2 billion just to keep current programs in place.

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Gov. Scott Walker conceded to Democratic challenger Tony Evers Wednesday after Evers won the election by just more than 1 percentage point. Walker originally wanted to wait until military ballots were counted and the official canvass was completed. He also expressed concern about 2,000 absentee ballots in Milwaukee that were reconstructed due to errors or damage.

After weeks of attack ads and mailings, the candidates for Wisconsin governor and U.S. Senate spent the weekend barnstorming the state, making their final appeals to voters before Tuesday's election.

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, what points the candidates wanted to hammer home, in their closing arguments.

Gov. Scott Walker and his Democratic challenger Tony Evers squared off for their second and final debate Friday night before the Nov. 6 election. The candidates debated health care, education, immigration and the economy — and repeated the same arguments they've consistently made throughout the campaign.  

Walker and Evers are locked in a tight race, with roughly a week to go until the election. In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com whether he thinks the candidates were able to sway voters with their arguments.

Gov. Scott Walker and his Democratic challenger Tony Evers, traded barbs in their first debate Friday night over taxes, health care and education. But, the candidates also found themselves addressing some bombshells that dropped earlier in the week.  

Last week saw two debates between Democratic U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Republican challenger Leah Vukmir. Both debates were characterized by tension and hostility as the two clashed over abortion, immigration, health care and a host of other issues. 

In this week's "Capitol Notes" conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com why he thought the debates were so combative. 

Althouse

After a bitter fight that culminated in sexual assault accusations and an FBI investigation, Judge Brett Kavanaugh is now Justice Kavanaugh. The U.S. Senate confirmed Kavanaugh over the weekend and he was then sworn in to a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Wisconsin's U.S. senators split on the matter, with Republican Ron Johnson voting yes and Democrat Tammy Baldwin voting no to confirmation. In this week's Capitol Notes conversation, WUWM's Marti Mikkelson asked JR Ross of wispolitics.com, whether those votes will come back to haunt the two senators.   

The Kavanaugh hearings took center stage last week in Washington, and both candidates is Wisconsin's U.S. Senate race weighed in on President Trump's nominee to the Supreme Court. 

Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin asked for an FBI investigation into claims that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a woman when the two were teenagers. Baldwin's Republican challenger Leah Vukmir, meanwhile, called for quick confirmation of Kavanaugh.  

The candidates for governor traded more barbs last week. State School Superintendent and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tony Evers took the opportunity to criticize his opponent, Republican Gov. Scott Walker, in his "state of education" address. Evers said Walker's education priorities are "out of whack" and that his policies are failing Wisconsin.

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Gov. Scott Walker is imploring state senators to return to the capitol, and vote on a bill that would provide $100 million in tax incentives to Kimberly-Clark. The company says it will close one of its plants in the Fox Valley if the Senate doesn't approve the incentives by the end of the month. 

Althouse

Last week, we saw Republican Gov. Scott Walker inserting himself into the national anthem debate. He called on all NFL players to stand during the anthem, instead of taking a knee. In doing so, Walker sided with President Trump, who's been vocal on the issue. 

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Some heavy hitters are beginning to appear in Wisconsin on behalf of the candidates this fall. Vice President Mike Pence held a fundraiser in Milwaukee last week for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Leah Vukmir. She's facing Democratic incumbent Tammy Baldwin in November.

Pence says both he — and President Trump — plan on coming back to Wisconsin to rally for Vukmir and Gov. Walker before the mid-term elections. Walker is locked in a tight race with Democratic challenger Tony Evers.

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The underlying theme of the midterm elections this fall is how voters feel about Donald Trump.

The president has been on a bumpy road in the past week. Two of his former close associates were found guilty. Others turned against him, agreeing to share potentially damaging information.

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