Gov. Scott Walker

Walker Releases Plan to Weaken Unions Nationally

Sep 14, 2015

Gov. Walker says he wants to do nationally, what he did in Wisconsin, when it comes to weakening public and private sector labor unions. He would go further by eliminating the National Labor Relations Board and striking recent orders from the Obama administration.

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Walker announced part of his plan.

Gov. Scott Walker
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Gov. Walker has been getting a lot of attention lately, but it’s not the kind the presidential hopeful wants. 

In recent weeks, he’s walked back comments on immigration, offended Muslims and criticized career politicians insisting he is not one of them. The continuous negative coverage is not something Walker was used to in Wisconsin.

Last week, while on the campaign trail, Gov. Walker was quoted as saying there are only a "handful of reasonable, moderate followers of Islam who don't share the radical beliefs" of Islamic terrorists.

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If Wisconsin Republicans voted in their presidential primary today, 25% would pick Gov. Scott Walker, according to the new Marquette Law School Poll. In April, 40% said they would select Walker.

Most state GOP voters favor other Republican candidates. Following Walker (25%) are Ben Carson (13%), Donald Trump (9%), Ted Cruz (8%), Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina (each 7%) and Jeb Bush (6%).

No Republican presidential hopeful this year has more riding on Iowa than Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker.

After leading in polls in Iowa most of the year, Walker is suddenly slumping. And he might have Donald Trump to blame.

It's not necessarily that the support Walker had earlier in the summer, when he was the clear front-runner in Iowa polls, has gone to the real estate mogul. Ben Carson, Carly Fiorina and Ted Cruz have seen something of a surge since the first presidential debate.

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Where Presidential Candidates Stand On Climate Change

Aug 11, 2015
ALDEN PELLETT AP

Last week, President Obama released a plan to cut carbon emissions from power plants. Climate change has also been cropping up on the presidential campaign trail — both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders have released their own proposals.

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The first GOP debate of the 2016 presidential season is over. Ten of the 17 Republican hopefuls took to the stage last night in Cleveland in a debate that sometimes saw testy exchanges between the candidates. 

Not surprisingly, Planned Parenthood, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were recurring themes throughout the night.  And so were very pointed questions.

Gov. Walker has been outspoken on the fact that he does not believe there should be exceptions for abortion. One of the first questions he got was whether he would let a woman die to save the life of an unborn child.

To promote his economic ideas and tout his blue collar credentials, Scott Walker has been using a unique tactic: talking about his shopping habits. In his presidential campaign kick-off, the Wisconsin governor talked about how much he and his wife, Tonette, love a certain Wisconsin-based discount retailer.

"Some of you know that Tonette and I like to shop at Kohl's. Over the years, I've learned that if I'm going to buy a new shirt, I go to the rack that says that the shirt was $29.99 but now is $19.99," he said.

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Over the course of the budget process that was recently completed, questions were asked about whether Governor Walker’s presumptive Presidential campaign affected the negotiation process.

Now that Walker’s campaign is no longer just presumptive, more questions are being asked about the campaign’s implications for public policy in Wisconsin.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Scorching temperatures near the triple digits weren't driving away the 325 people gathered to hear Scott Walker speak at a Lexington, S.C., barbecue joint Wednesday.

Packed under an open-air porch with fans that were hardly helping, the heat didn't seem to affect the enthusiasm for the Wisconsin governor on just his second day as an announced presidential candidate — and it's the type of excitement he'll need to generate to win the important South Carolina GOP primary.

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The Wisconsin Supreme Court on Thursday handed Gov. Walker a major victory – just days after he officially launched his bid for President. The court effectively ended an investigation into Walker’s 2012 recall campaign. Prosecutors had been examining whether the campaign illegally coordinated activities with conservative funders such as Wisconsin Club for Growth.

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Governor Scott Walker's official presidential campaign announcement is receiving plenty of national attention - including from National Public Radio.

While NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley was in Wisconsin to cover the announcement, he stopped by Lake Effect to chat about Walker's presidential run.

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