Gov. Tony Evers

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Gov. Tony Evers re-created Wisconsin's pardons board on Thursday, fulfilling a campaign promise to again consider granting pardons after his Republican predecessor, Scott Walker, halted the process eight years ago.

Evers, a Democrat, is putting his own mark on the process, declining to consider commutation of prison sentences as previous governors did and instituting a new restriction making people on the sex offender registry ineligible.

Emily Files

University of Wisconsin System President Ray Cross is calling Republican lawmakers’ UW funding proposal "micromanaging" and a "missed opportunity."

Cross was in Milwaukee for a Board of Regents meeting this week. It was the first regents gathering since the Joint Committee on Finance surprised UW leaders with its spending plan. The budget-writing committee voted along party lines to advance a $58 million increase for UW schools over the next two years.  

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Republican lawmakers scaled back another piece of Gov. Tony Evers’ education funding plan this week: support for the University of Wisconsin System.

The Democratic governor is seeking a $126 million increase for UW schools. But the GOP-dominated budget-writing committee settled on a much lower number — $58 million.

It follows the Joint Committee on Finance's decision last week to chop Evers' K-12 spending plan by more than half.

Emily Files

Wisconsin's powerful Joint Finance Committee will meet next Thursday to discuss funding for K-12 schools. Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat, wants to increase state support by $1.4 billion – including major infusions for special education, general aid, and mental health. It would be a windfall for districts after years of mostly stagnant funding.

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Across Wisconsin, tens of thousands of people don’t trust the water that comes out of their tap — due to lead, agricultural runoff or industrial pollution.

To address water quality, there’s $70 million in Gov. Tony Evers’ budget and he's declared 2019 "the year of clean drinking water." However, some in the Republican state Legislature say too much of that money would go to Milwaukee to remove lead water lines, neglecting other areas of the state.

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Wisconsin’s laws regulating marijuana possession have been a patchwork of municipal ordinances for years. Now, Gov. Tony Evers is hoping to change that.

In his first budget proposal, Evers proposed a state-wide policy decriminalizing marijuana and legalizing its use for medicinal purposes. Still, while Evers presents a clear path forward, there remains a lot of confusion over what his proposal would mean for Wisconsinites. 

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A divided Wisconsin Supreme Court on Tuesday restored 82 appointees of then-Gov. Scott Walker who were confirmed during a lame-duck legislative session, handing a victory to Republicans and defeat to Democratic Gov. Tony Evers.

Teran Powell

Wisconsinites from different backgrounds and professions are lining up to voice their concerns about the state’s budget. The Joint Finance Committee is holding four hearings throughout the state, giving the public a chance to give recommendations, support, or criticisms of the proposal.

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Gov. Tony Evers' two-year state budget proposal was released late in February. As expected, the proposal includes many of the things the governor campaigned on: increased funding for education, tax cuts for middle and low-income earners, as well as more funds for road repairs. There have been many objections from the Republican-led Legislature, and it remains unclear how much of Evers' budget will be passed.

Chuck Quirmbach

The fate of proposed state building projects at UW-Milwaukee, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and other sites remains unclear. Republican lawmakers Wednesday blocked the Wisconsin Building Commission from recommending more than 80 projects wanted by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers. 

Usually, the building commission goes along with most or all of the projects recommended in what's known as the governor's capital budget. With that momentum, the Legislature's budget committee then later typically approves the commission's list. 

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Emily Files

In his proposed biennial capital budget, Gov. Tony Evers wants to spend $2.5 billion on public building projects. About half of that money would go to University of Wisconsin facilities, including a new $130 million chemistry building at UW-Milwaukee.

On Thursday, UW System President Ray Cross held a press conference to rally support for the proposed chemistry building replacement.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin Gov., and cancer survivor, Tony Evers defended his $2.5 billion capital budget proposal during a visit Friday to the Medical College of Wisconsin in Wauwatosa. 

Evers drew criticism from Republican leaders in the state Legislature after unveiling this week his two-year borrowing plan for state building projects. One lawmaker calls Evers' plan to roughly triple the last capital budget proposed by former Republican Gov. Scott Walker, "alarming."

But Evers maintains that the projects he wants built would help Wisconsin residents.

Emily Files

Tony Evers’ background is in education, including serving as the top education official in Wisconsin. Now that he is governor, Evers is proposing a raft of school funding changes. He delivered his first budget address on Feb. 28.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is now touring the state, highlighting the $83 billion state budget proposal he formally unveiled Thursday night. The tour comes as state Republicans continue to heavily criticize the plan from the Democratic governor.

One of Evers' stops on Friday was at a public school in Sturtevant, Schulte Elementary. There, he read to students and met with the news media.

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During his campaign for governor, Democrat Tony Evers pledged to increase the role of science in the Department of Natural Resources. That’s something that had diminished during the tenure of his Republican predecessor Scott Walker.

Evers also promoted renewable energy projects, saying they would both protect Wisconsin resources and boost economic development.

When he was sworn into office, Evers mentioned he would take the issue of global warming seriously.

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