guns

Police Shoot 2nd Teen In Wisconsin Schools In 2 Days

Dec 3, 2019
Lydia Slattery / USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin

Updated at 3:39 p.m. CT

A Wisconsin high school resource officer shot a 16-year-old student Tuesday after the boy stabbed him in his office, marking the second time in as many days that a school resource officer has been involved in a student shooting in the state.

Courtesy of The Waukesha Freeman

Updated Tuesday at 4:17 p.m. CT

A 17-year-old Waukesha South High School student was shot by a police officer on Monday morning after allegedly aiming a pellet gun at police. 

Guns: when and how to regulate them. It's one of the biggest issues across the country. But the U.S. Supreme Court has rarely weighed in on the issue. In modern times, it has ruled decisively just twice. Now it's on the brink of doing so again.

With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, there now are five conservative justices who may be willing to shut down many attempts at regulation, just as the NRA's lock on state legislatures may be waning.

Chuck Quirmbach

Updated at 2:23 p.m. CT

The Big Boy All-Weather Rifle, made by Henry Repeating Arms in Rice Lake, has been voted winner of this year’s Coolest Thing Made in Wisconsin contest. It's the fourth year for the competition, which is run by Johnson Financial Group and the state's largest business organization, Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce.

Wisconsin Eye

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers and Democratic lawmakers unveiled a proposal for a "red flag" bill Thursday.

The bill would allow judges to seize guns from someone they determine to be a threat. Democrats say the bill should be nonpartisan and is about saving lives. Republicans say the bill is a non-starter.

starkytang / stock.adobe.com

The battle over stronger gun laws has resumed in Wisconsin. A Milwaukee state senator and other Democratic legislators have introduced a bill requiring background checks for more gun sales. But it's unclear if the Republican-controlled Legislature will allow the bill to move.   

Recent mass shootings in Texas, Ohio, and other states have again prompted calls for tighter controls on gun purchases.

There's a countdown clock on the website for RW Arms, a Texas-based seller of firearms accessories. It tracks the days, hours, minutes and seconds until they're no longer permitted to sell bump stocks, devices that allow semi-automatic rifles to fire almost as fast as illegal machine guns.

Promotional emails from RW Arms also include the countdown clock, urging customers to "order now" to "enjoy this unique firing experience" while they can.

Chuck Quirmbach

Researchers are trying to make guns safer, partly through devices that limit who can fire a weapon. The science and financing still have a ways to go before many gun owners have a so called "smart gun." But a southeastern Wisconsin activist group is optimistic enough about gun innovation that it sponsored a Firearm Safety Expo on Wednesday.

The local activist group Common Ground sponsored a Firearm Safety Expo Wednesday at MATC-South Campus in Oak Creek.

Courtesy of BenShot

A Wisconsin manufacturer that gave guns to its employees as a Christmas present is reporting a good holiday sales season. But a local group that worries about gun violence says the gift was a potentially bad idea.

The conflict shows the debate over guns is far from finished, and views may partly be based on where people live.

BenShot is the company that gave guns to its employees. It operates a small factory southwest of Green Bay, Wis., in the village of Hortonville. The firm makes drinking glasses — with a unique twist.

The Trump administration is banning bump stocks, the firearm attachment that allows a semiautomatic weapon to shoot almost as fast as a machine gun.

The devices, also known as slide fires, came under intense scrutiny after they were used by the gunman who opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas last year, killing 58 people.

The massacre touched off a public outcry, including from some lawmakers, for the accessories to be banned.

Marti Mikkelson

The City of Milwaukee is giving away free gun locks in response to the accidental shooting death of a nine-year-old girl. Police say Miyanna Jelks was fatally shot by her nine-year-old brother in an apparent accident on the city’s north side.

Her parents have been arrested on charges of operating a drug house, child neglect and leaving a gun within reach of a child. City leaders and community activists shared ideas Monday that they hope prevent similar tragedies.

Updated at 10:25 p.m. ET

A prominent Kremlin-linked Russian politician has methodically cultivated ties with leaders of the National Rifle Association and documented efforts in real time over six years to leverage those connections and gain deeper access into American politics, NPR has learned.

Russian politician Alexander Torshin said his ties to the NRA provided him access to Donald Trump — and the opportunity to serve as a foreign election observer in the United States during the 2012 election.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump hosted lawmakers from both parties to discuss gun policy and school safety on Wednesday. During the freewheeling meeting, Trump appeared to support a number of conflicting measures and showed naivete about the legislative process.

Updated at 3:05 a.m. ET Friday

Plans for a speedy Senate vote on gun legislation crumbled Thursday as Senate leaders announced plans to move on to long-planned banking legislation, while congressional Republicans struggle to make sense of President Trump's wishes on guns.

Updated at 7:52 p.m. ET

In a freewheeling meeting with lawmakers on efforts to curtail gun violence, President Trump appeared to throw his support behind a number of conflicting measures, including some that are opposed by the powerful gun lobby.

Conservatives and allies of the president were angered by such signals on Wednesday, while others have begun to sound the alarm that Trump is continuing to demonstrate an unfamiliarity with basic policy proposals and a misunderstanding of the legislative process.

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