hate crimes

Updated Nov. 12, 5:25 p.m. ET

While the number of reported hate crimes dipped slightly in 2018, violence against individuals rose to a 16-year high, according to numbers released Tuesday by the FBI.

The FBI's annual tally counted 7,120 hate crimes reported last year, 55 fewer than the year before. The main concern for extremism trackers, however, is the rising level of violence — the report showed an increase in the number of "crimes against persons," such as intimidation, assault and homicide.

Maayan Silver

Updated Wednesday at 2:29 p.m. CT  

Milwaukee prosecutors on Wednesday charged a 61-year-old white man with a hate crime for allegedly throwing battery acid on a local Hispanic man. 

The decision from prosecutors means Clifton Blackwell could face an enhanced sentence if convicted of the charge of first-degree reckless injury. Prosecutors added the sentencing enhancers of hate crime and use of a dangerous weapon.

Maayan Silver

Community members and leaders turned out Thursday night to support the Muslim community in Milwaukee and worldwide. It was a vigil in response to the terror attack in New Zealand last week when a white supremacist gunned down 50 people at two mosques.

The vigil was held at the Islamic Society of Milwaukee. It opened with 10th graders Obaid Grays and Samawia Akhter reading and translating from the Qur’an.

Carl Court/Getty Images

All across the world people are grappling with how to deal with hate crimes. Fifty people were killed last week in New Zealand after someone opened fire at two mosques. It’s in the aftermath of such heinous crimes that questions such as how and why and when will this end are the most prevalent. 

Fatih Harpci teaches religion at Carthage College in Kenosha. He was saddened by the incidents in New Zealand but says hate can also be found here in Wisconsin.

Across Wisconsin, Recent Rises in Hate, Bias Incidents Spark Concern

Nov 12, 2017
Courtesy of Jeff Glaze

The contentious 2016 presidential election raised religious and racial tensions, but experts say the fears fueling hate and bias incidents began years earlier.

The reports came in at an alarming pace. A student at a middle school near Milwaukee drew a stick figure with a swastika on its face. The image held a gun pointed at another stick figure, which had the name of the student’s Jewish teacher on it.

Following a local television report stating that someone beat and cut a Muslim woman on Milwaukee's south side early Monday - after demanding she take off her hijab, the Council on American-Islamic Relations has called for a hate crimes investigation.

Dave Reid, flickr

Twice, in recent months, someone vandalized a room Marquette University has turned into an Islamic prayer space and nearby hallways signs. The first incident reportedly occurred following November's presidential election; the second, after President Trump released his revised travel ban against about a half-dozen predominantly Muslim nations.

fullempty / Fotolia

Since the November election, reported incidents of overt hostility towards minorities and immigrants have increased. From physical altercations to poison pen letters and internet comments, some people seem to feel emboldened by the election results to express opinions that are at best unkind and at worst racist, misogynistic or homophobic.

It’s been one year since a white supremacist opened fire killing six people and injuring several others at the Sikh Temple in Oak Creek.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says the government will keep numbers on hate crimes against seven groups.