immigration

Milwaukee Art Museum

A mural wrapped around the outside of a Milwaukee County bus that tackles immigration enforcement and family separations is sparking debate.

The Milwaukee Art Museum paid for the mural as part of a summer art program for teens. But a Milwaukee County supervisor, Dan Sebring, is demanding the artwork be removed.

The Trump administration is moving forward with regulations that are expected to dramatically reshape the U.S. immigration system by denying green cards and visas to immigrants who use — or are expected to use — a wide range of federal, state and local government benefits, including food stamps, housing vouchers and Medicaid.

The final version of the "public charge" rule, which has been a top priority for immigration hard-liners in the White House, is set to be published in the Federal Register on Wednesday.

Chuck Quirmbach

On Wednesday, hundreds of members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) became the latest religious group to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policies. They marched to the offices of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office in downtown Milwaukee. 

The ELCA is holding its annual Churchwide Assembly at the Wisconsin Center this week.

Louna LePoivre

Jewish residents from across the Milwaukee area gathered outside the local Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) office Thursday. They were protesting conditions at detention centers along the southern border of the U.S. Similar protests have been taking place across the country.

The mood was sometimes somber as protesters gathered outside the Department of Homeland Security building in downtown Milwaukee, chanting and singing. Their goal: to show support for people being detained by ICE because they don't have the correct documentation. 

The Trump administration announced on Monday it is expanding fast-track deportation regulations to include the removal of undocumented immigrants who cannot prove they have been in the U.S. continuously for two years or more.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Many people in America are living in fear. When the Trump administration announced deportation raids in major U.S. cities, some communities were thrown into a panic.

"People are afraid to go to work, afraid to go to school, afraid to report crimes they see in the street," says Emilio De Torre, director of community engagement at the ACLU of Wisconsin.

President Trump's threatened roundup of undocumented immigrant families this weekend that set migrants in many communities on edge showed few signs of materializing on Sunday, the second time rumors of a large-scale immigration enforcement operation failed to come to fruition.

Instead, in the cities where rumors of mass raids swirled, many immigrants stayed inside their homes, as jitters turned typically vibrant migrant markets and commercial corridors eerily quiet.

Joy Powers

The crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border may seem far away, but for many Milwaukeeans it hits close to home. That’s why Latinx community members have come together for an event Friday night in solidarity with the Close the Camps movement.

The event will feature a nativity scene surrounded by fencing — to draw parallels between the holy family and migrants detained in border facilities. 

Alesandra Tejeda

Next year’s presidential election is on the minds of many people attending the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) convention in downtown Milwaukee. It runs through Saturday and up to 20,000 people from across the country are expected to attend. Many of the workshops are focused on political activism. 

Linda Chavez traveled here from Austin, Texas. She says health care, immigration and economic development are weighing on her mind:

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Community leaders and activists will gather at the federal courthouse in downtown Milwaukee Tuesday to protest President Donald Trump’s containment of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Thousands of asylum-seekers have been held.

Critics accuse the Republican president of separating families and keeping children housed in deplorable conditions. The protesters will participate in a “National Day of Action,” demanding the closure of the facilities.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains images that some readers may find disturbing.

The desperate and tragic plight of a father and daughter who drowned while trying to cross the border from Mexico into the U.S. has become a new flashpoint in the border crisis, after a photographer captured a haunting image that shows the pair lying facedown, washed onto the banks of the Rio Grande.

Milwaukee and Racine immigration advocates are urging President Donald Trump to reconsider his plan to step up deportations of people who Trump says have been given due process and have been ordered to leave the country.

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

On the day of his self-declared presidential campaign kickoff, President Trump is threatening to deport "millions" of immigrants in the United States illegally beginning "next week."

But what's known is far less definitive.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET Friday

President Trump says he will begin imposing tariffs on all goods imported from Mexico beginning June 10, unless that country does more to help reduce illegal immigration from Central America.

Shares of automaker stocks fell Friday morning following the news. It also drew a response from carmakers — many of whom have built facilities in Mexico in recent years to take advantage of cheaper labor and easy access to the U.S.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced an immigration proposal that would dramatically reshape the legal immigration system in the United States.

The plan "puts jobs, wages and safety of American workers first," Trump said in the White House Rose Garden on Thursday.

"We must implement an immigration system that will allow our citizens to prosper for generations to come," he said.

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