Journalism

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As a perennial swing state, it’s become an election-year tradition for national media outlets to swoop into Wisconsin to quickly gauge the hearts and minds of likely voters before whisking away their reporters to cover other stories. The practice is known as parachute journalism, and it can have some unfortunate repercussions. 

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As protests over racial justice have swept America, many are learning the hard way what their First Amendment rights entail. Like the freedom of assembly and freedom of speech, the free press has more than a few caveats too.

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In a moment of crisis, the first thing most people do is turn on the news. TV and radio stations provide the public with important public health directives, while newspapers ask a lot of questions and lay them all out.

But even before the coronavirus outbreak, America lost over 7,800 journalism jobs in 2019 alone.

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The name Parkland — like so many other American cities — has become synonymous with a mass shooting. But in many ways, the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland is different from those that came before it. 

Marquette Alumna Receives National Award For Her Notable Journalism Career

May 1, 2019
Mary-Ann Bendel

If you look at the list of producers and showhosts at WUWM, with just a couple of exceptions, it consists of nearly all women. While the demographic breakdown varies from newsroom to newsroom, women do make up a large percentage of journalists working in the broadcast industry today. 

Courtesy of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The final installment of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Unsolved podcast series was released Thursday. In its third season, reporter Gina Barton investigates the mysterious death of a somewhat controversial Catholic priest in small town Wisconsin 20 years ago.

Courtesy of the Milwauke Journal Sentinel

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's true crime series Unsolved explores cold cases from Wisconsin through both print reporting and an accompanying podcast. Its third season began earlier this year and features a two decade old crime in the small town of Dane, outside Madison. It looks at the murder of Alfred Kunz, a somewhat controversial Catholic priest that died in Dane in violent circumstances.

courtesy Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Alfred Kunz was a Catholic priest, the pastor of a church called St. Michael in the rural south central Wisconsin town of Dane. He served the community for years, but on March 4, 1998, he was found murdered in violent fashion in the church complex. No one has been arrested or convicted for the crime.

Remembering NPR's Carl Kasell

Apr 18, 2018
NPR photo

Longtime NPR newscaster and Wait! Wait! Don't Tell Me sidekick Carl Kasell died this week of complications from Alzheimer's disease.  He was 84 years old.  On today's show, we revisit our 2012 interview with him, recorded while he was in town recording an episode of the comedy quiz show.

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It’s Sunshine Week, and that’s not a crack about the weather. The annual event is an effort led by news organizations, that seeks to inform people about their right to access public information. It’s a right that has had many enemies - both historically and currently - but it’s also a right that has endured many tests.

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For more than a decade, residents in St. Francis, Wisconsin have been complaining about smells. Sometimes putrid and often abrasive, these smells wafted over local residents from the nearby Mid-America Steel Drum plant.

NPR photo

NPR was a different place when Robert Siegel walked in the door for the first time in late 1976.  For one thing, it was still commonly referred to by its full name.  "I was utterly seduced by National Public Radio," Siegel says.  "We didn't shrink from spelling it out in those days."

Foreign and Commonwealth Office / Flickr

When journalist Maziar Bahari went to his home country Iran in 2009, he had no idea what was in store for him. As protests mounted in opposition to the re-election of then President Mahmoud Ahmadinijad, Bahari was imprisoned by the Iranian Government - simply for doing his job.

Eric Von had already been in radio for a long time when he started making regular contributions to Lake Effect and WUWM. Von hosted talk shows at a variety of stations throughout his career, winding up at WNOV. Von also was the host of  Precious Lives, a collaborative series between WUWM, 371 Productions and others.

Clare Peterson / Marquette

As President Obama prepares to give the final press conference of his presidency on Wednesday, NPR's Michel Martin is looking towards the next Administration with a wary - but not entirely pessimistic - eye.

"I've just never been a fan of being mad in advance," the weekend host of All Things Considered says, "or being afraid in advance.  I think you give people the benefit of the doubt until they give you a reason to think otherwise."

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