Lake Effect

Jody Spiegelhoff

In 2017, Maricella Chairez died by suicide in her cell at the Racine County Juvenile Detention Center. Although she was only 16-years-old, her suicide was the culmination of many years of struggling with abuse and mismanaged mental health care.

Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

The holiday season is fast approaching, beginning with Halloween this weekend. The city of Milwaukee is not officially recognizing trick-or-treat hours in an effort to reduce the spread of COVID-19. But there are still ways to safely reimagine the costumed event.

“Some of the things we can do are ... to have a candy hunt in your own yard,” Amanda Simanek says. “So if you have some old Easter eggs lying around, we can merge these two celebrations. Put candy inside and hide them in the yard.”

Courtesy of Ahead of the Curve

Nowadays, there are multiple LGBTQ media outlets for people around the world to tap into and see themselves and their stories represented. But this hasn’t always been the case.

When Franco Stevens realized she was a lesbian, there was hardly any representation of queer women. So in 1990, she decided to change that and founded Curve — the best-selling lesbian lifestyle magazine that still exists today.

Wes Tank

There are a lot of things vying for the attention of Milwaukee youth and most will experience at least one adverse childhood experience that can make their adult lives more difficult. 

And having at least one adult provide a positive environment can help steer kids in the right direction. For the last four decades, Running Rebels has been doing just that for hundreds of Milwaukee youth. The organization works to prevent involvement in gangs, drugs, violence and the juvenile justice system. 

Courtesy of Lori Cross

Lori Cross dropped out of her all-girls’ high school in Michigan because there wasn’t enough physics and math to keep her challenged. Technical college was a little better, but Cross found her place at Northwestern University, where she got a degree in chemical engineering and became the first woman to play ice hockey on a men’s NCAA team.

Chuck Quirmbach

  

When Foxconn first announced its plan to open a huge, LCD factory near Racine, the project promised to be one of the biggest deals in Wisconsin history. Foxconn and Wisconsin’s Republican leadership claimed it would create 13,000 jobs and generate billions in revenue. And that was key since the deal also meant that Foxconn would be getting $3 billion in subsidies, making it the largest government handout to a foreign company in U.S. history.

Mark Savage

Now that we’re driving less, doing something like purchasing a muscle or luxury car you’ve always wanted probably isn’t a high priority. In addition to consumer trends, many auto plants are closed, or their chain supply has been greatly impacted. 

But that doesn’t mean that our automotive contributor Mark Savage doesn’t get to test drive and enjoy some high-powered muscle cars. He says as powerful vehicles increase in price, they are losing their muscle but keeping the speed.

Breaking Fast film

When it comes to LGBTQ films, there are a number of good romantic comedies. And a new film, Breaking Fast by writer and director Mike Mosallam, is adding the underrepresented queer, Arab Muslim-American voices to cinema.

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Milwaukeeans are already lining up outside early voting locations to cast their ballot in this year’s election. Many have already voted by mail or absentee. No matter how Wisconsinites choose to make their voice heard this year, they’ll all have to show proof of who they are. 

READ: Wisconsin 2020 Election: Key Deadlines For Voter Registration, Voting Absentee And In Person

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Every year in October, Nobel Prizes are awarded to people throughout the world. This year, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three astrophysicists for their work in advancing black hole discoveries.

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Wisconsin is currently facing a massive spike in coronavirus cases. The state continues to break daily records of confirmed cases. The death toll reached more than 1,600 people this week and hospitalizations have more than tripled in the last month.

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Family members and loved ones of people incarcerated in Wisconsin are growing more concerned about the spread of COVID-19.

At least three state prisons have reported outbreaks among inmates, and at least two people have died at the Dodge County Correctional Facility. The number of deaths from COVID-19 inside prisons could be higher, but the Department of Corrections doesn’t release that information due to privacy concerns.

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The problems facing incarcerated people often don’t end when they are released. People who serve time in prison can face discrimination when looking for housing or a job, and the stigma of going to prison can make it difficult to reestablish ties in their community.

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While grocery stores have adjusted to higher demands and farmers markets wrap up their season, 2020 has made a lot of people think more about how they get their food.

In March, searches for community supported agriculture, or CSAs, jumped during the initial stages of the coronavirus pandemic when grocery stores shelves were picked clean. But where grocery stores may have left a gap, local farms and CSA groups have swept in to take advantage of an opportunity to reach new audiences.

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Steven Olikara says growing up in Brookfield, Wis., he learned about listening and collaborating. He says talking things through rather than tearing people down whose opinions you might not share just made sense.

But as a UW-Madison student, Olikara, who graduated with degrees in environmental studies and political science, saw the polar opposite when he spent time talking with legislators at the state capitol.

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