Lake Effect

Michelle Maternowski

How do you use the word protest? Often, we think of a protest as a call for change. But there are actually many different forms of protest.

As protests over racial justice and police brutality continue around the country and in Milwaukee, we explore the different types of protest and how, despite their differences, they all are described using the same word.

Pamela Oliver is a professor emerita of sociology at UW-Madison. She has spent decades studying the different kinds of protest and their efficacy. She starts by describing the basic approach to protesting.

Azure Mahara Photography

The faith community played an important role in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. And that legacy continues today. In Milwaukee, a number of faith groups have led and joined in the ongoing protests over racial justice. One of those leaders is Pastor Kenneth Lock.

He's with Evolve Church, a non-denominational church that's active in supporting the community. Lock is also a barber and the head chaplain for the Milwaukee Bucks.

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Every month, Adam Carr from the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service joins Lake Effect to talk about some of the exciting events happening in the area. In normal times, these events spanned the city, encouraging people to get out and engage with the community. But of course, the times we’re living in are anything but normal. 

"What’s happening in our community with the pandemic and the protests is kind of constantly evolving. We almost don’t know what’s going to happen from day to day," says Carr. 

Cedarburg Art Museum

Racial difference has been front and center in recent political and social discourse. But between all of the slogans, it’s easy to overlook the beauty and humanity.

The Cedarburg Art Museum is trying to bring some of that beauty and humanity to a town that’s less than 1% Black.

Aliza Baran

The Fourth of July is fast approaching. And with COVID-19 infections on the rise once again, many people are looking to their backyards as the best option for celebrating the holiday this year. 

People will be bringing the grills out of the garage and firing them up with hopes of making tasty or at the very least edible treats. To help get us started, Milwaukee Magazine’s Ann Christenson shares some of her grilling tips and tricks.

Essay: The First Rehearsal

Jul 2, 2020
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Most theaters have been dark for months now due to the coronavirus pandemic. Some are offering their work online. But for people who love the theater, it’s been hard to replace that feeling of seeing a live performance. 

Essayist Marie Kohler recalls her first experience in a theater in her essay “The First Rehearsal.” And she looks hopefully to a time when we all might be able to return.

“Come along and watch a rehearsal tonight while I’m at my theater meeting.”

My mother pushed away from the dining room table and grabbed her purse.

Emily Files / WUWM

Protests sparked by police killings of Black people are drawing attention to the United States' persistent racial disparities. Those disparities are also widespread in education. Wisconsin has some of the largest test score and high school graduation gaps between Black and white students.

Christian Kaspar-Bartke / Getty Images

The history of policing in America is somewhat unique. As WUWM explored in June, the organizations that operate as our law enforcement were forged before the Civil War, where local patrols were mandated to return stolen property: runaway Black slaves.

But many other countries have radically different approaches to law enforcement that aren’t influenced by the unique racial and economic politics of the United States.

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When the state of Wisconsin first announced safer-at-home orders in March, it also ordered a temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures. Unlike the coronavirus pandemic, the order was limited to a 60-day-period that ended in May. Now, as COVID-19 infections are spiking, so too are evictions.

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When people started staying at home due to the coronavirus pandemic, we all looked for things to do for fun to keep us occupied while staying in the house. One major outlet is games.

Sometimes in a moment of social unrest, it’s hard to look past our own backyard. To keep things in a global perspective, Lake Effect has long called upon Carthage College Professor Art Cyr, author of After the Cold War.  

“The basic commitment to human freedom, to basic equality under the law as we accept in U.S., Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and most of Europe, has become increasingly widespread since the Cold War,” says Cyr.

Susan Bence

Each month, UWM distinguished professor of atmospheric science Paul Roebber talks with Lake Effect as part of our climate conversations series. In this final installment, two policy experts join the conversation.

Amber Meyer Smith is from the organization Clean Wisconsin. She’s a member of Gov. Tony Evers’ climate change task force.

Lorde Fredd33, Brief Candles, Genesis Renji, Pete Freeman

Although most live shows have been put on hold by the pandemic, Milwaukee bands continue to release new songs  — and Matt Wild has listened to most of them. Wild is one of the co-founders of Milwaukee Record, which describes itself as an online source for music, culture, and gentle sarcasm.

Among the many cultural things Milwaukee Record keeps track of is a nearly exhaustive list of new music from local musicians. Wild is the curator of that list and he joins Lake Effect every month to share a sample of what he’s been listening to for our Milwaukee Music Roundup.

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The summer is in full swing and gardens are looking green. But there are always ways to make our flower beds sparkle a bit brighter. 

Every month, Lake Effect contributor Melinda Myers gives her expert tips on gardening. This month, she explains the process of deadheading flowers.

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About a week ago, photos of Black people who were killed by police and private citizens were attached to nooses and hung from a tree in Riverside Park on Milwaukee’s east side. Those pictured were Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Eric Garner, and Botham Jean.

People who saw the photos and nooses were angry and shocked, and the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office opened an investigation.

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