Lake Effect

Courtesy of Tearman Spencer

The Milwaukee city attorney’s race doesn’t always get a lot of attention. But this year, in an upset, Tearman Spencer beat out long-time incumbent Grant Langley, who was in office for 36 years. Spencer ran on the platform of change and made history by being elected as Milwaukee’s first black city attorney.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history in Milwaukee’s spring election. This is part three: Milwaukee City Attorney Tearman Spencer.

Erica Heisdorf Bisquerra

Climate change poses daunting threats to every facet and form of life. The Great Lakes region is expected to be hit by an increase in heat waves, flooding and severe storms.

Climate change disproportionately impacts people already grappling with obstacles, particularly in urban areas.

Walnut Way would appear to fit that description. The 30-block section of Milwaukee, 2 miles northwest of downtown falls within the Lindsay Heights neighborhood.

Courtesy of Jackson Weber

Voters made history in Wisconsin’s April 7 spring election by voting during a global pandemic. They also made history by electing the first black Milwaukee County executive and Milwaukee city attorney, and the first Latina and openly bisexual Milwaukee alderwoman.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history. This is part two: 8th District Alderwoman JoCasta Zamarripa.

Meltwater Pulse, Quinten Farr, Something To Do, Vinz Clortho

Matt Wild is one of the co-founders of Milwaukee Record, which describes itself as an online source for music, culture, and gentle sarcasm. Among the many cultural things Milwaukee Record keeps track of is a nearly exhaustive list of new music from local musicians.

Matt is the curator of that list and he joins Lake Effect every month to share with us a sample of what he’s been listening to. We call it the Milwaukee Music Roundup, and much like last month, many of these songs were written in light of current events. 

Courtesy of David Crowley

Voters made history in Wisconsin’s April 7 spring election by voting during a global pandemic. They also made history by electing the first black Milwaukee County executive and Milwaukee city attorney, and the first Latina and openly bisexual Milwaukee alderwoman.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history. This is part one: Milwaukee County Executive-elect David Crowley.

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a new database earlier this month. It’s called Nature’s Archives, and NOAA says it’s the most comprehensive temperature change database ever assembled.

Andrei / stock.adobe.com

There's been a lot of news recently about President Trump limiting immigration. On April 22, he signed an executive order suspending new green cards from being issued for immigrants looking to become permanent U.S. residents. There are some exceptions, like for children of U.S. citizens or for health care professionals coming to help fight the spread of COVID-19. 

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The coronavirus has transformed how hospitals are operating. Hospitals that once bustled with activity have been reduced to treating only the sickest among us, and many medical students who once roamed the hallways have been sent home out of concern for their health.

Lake Effect contributor Bruce Campbell is a head and neck surgeon who's been teaching medical students at the Medical College of Wisconsin for the past 30 years. He reflects on teaching his students outside of a hospital in this essay titled “Narrative Medicine in the time of COVID-19.” 

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Breathing. It’s something that we do without thinking about it. However, most of the time we’re practicing shallow breathing, which can sometimes make us feel out of breath and anxious — especially when we’re already stressed.

When we actively concentrate on breathing techniques that fully utilize our lungs, abdominals and diaphragm, it can actually reduce stress, create mindfulness, and even lower blood pressure.

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While Wisconsin is under a safer-at-home order to slow the spread of the coronavirus, the home may not be a safe place for people living with domestic violence and abuse. 

Sean M. Haffey / Getty Images

Protesters across the country have petitioned local governments to re-open states and towns for business. On Friday, members of the “Wisconsinites Against Excessive Quarantine” group, which is sponsored by the Wisconsin Firearms Coalition, demonstrated at the State Capitol in Madison. The New York Times reported that Wisconsin’s demonstrations were among the biggest in America, with several thousand people in attendance.

Maayan Silver

The urban-rural divide in Wisconsin has become ingrained in our culture. Right now, that divide is dangerous. 

Ideological divides have led to in-fighting in state government, with the Republican-led Legislature pitting itself against Gov. Tony Evers, a Democrat. Some rural communities that haven’t been hit hard by the pandemic are questioning the need for social distancing mandates, while people in cities are seeing their communities ravaged by the disease.

Pinehold Gardens

While the stay-at-home order has us remaining in place, it’s also sparked interest in getting outside and gardening as another way to provide food and limit what you’ll need at the grocery store.

But if you’re considering growing food for the first time, knowing what to plant and when can be a big task. WUWM farming contributor Dave Kozlowski of Pinehold Gardens in Oak Creek plans to keep planting and harvesting as normal, with the hope of a farmers market in the near future.

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As nonessential businesses keep their doors closed around the country, small business owners are losing capital needed to make payroll, pay bills, and try to reopen when it’s allowed.

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As stay-at-home orders have been extended in most states due to the coronavirus pandemic, there’s been a greater focus on housing more generally. Skyrocketing unemployment and uncertainty about the future has made it more difficult for people to make rent.

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