national security

Audrey Nowakowski

As NPR's first national security correspondent, and now as co-host of All Things Considered, Mary Louise Kelly has traveled to the far corners of the globe — from the Khyber Pass in Iraq to North Korea. However, until this month there was one exotic place the journalist had never been — Wisconsin.

Kelly was the featured guest at WUWM's Murrow Society event recently.  In conversation with Lake Effect's Mitch Teich, Kelly touched on a host of issues that have been part of her life:

Earlier this year, President Trump laid out an ambitious plan for U.S. missile defenses. "Our goal is simple," Trump said during a speech in January. "To ensure that we can detect and destroy any missile launched against the United States, anywhere, anytime, anyplace."

To reach that goal, the administration's proposed new defense budget calls for hundreds of millions of dollars to study the use of lasers and particle beams in space. "It's new technology," the president said.

Except it isn't.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

An additional 3,750 troops will be sent to the Southern border to help install wire barriers and monitor crossings, officials said. The new deployment will bring the number of active-duty troops there to around 6,000.

In a tweet on Sunday, President Trump said that "STRONG Border Security" is necessary in the face of "Caravans marching through Mexico and toward our Country."

At a Russian base on the Baltic Sea, construction is underway to house a new generation of nuclear-capable missiles.

Tentlike structures have popped up to shelter the mobile missile system, known as Iskander, which is capable of firing weapons with both conventional and nuclear warheads. Recent satellite imagery of the territory, known as Kaliningrad, also shows that old buildings on the base are being demolished.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday denied that he has been trying to conceal details about his discussions with Russian President Vladimir Putin after a pair of explosive press reports over the weekend.

"I never worked for Russia," Trump told reporters. "It's a disgrace that you even asked that question because it's a whole big fat hoax. It's just a hoax."

Updated at 11:27 p.m. ET

President Trump made his case to the American people Tuesday night for why a massive wall along the Mexican border is necessary, using his first Oval Office address to outline his conditions for ending the 18-day-and-counting partial government shutdown.

Chelsea Beck/NPR

President Trump addressed the nation about border security Tuesday night. Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following.

The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

More troops are expected to be deployed to the Southern border to construct or upgrade 160 miles of fencing and provide medical care to a steady stream of migrant families arriving from Central America, according to military sources.

The deployment and fence construction along the California and Arizona borders would be paid for by the Pentagon, from the Department of Defense's discretionary funding.

For years, the world has imposed strict sanctions on North Korea in an attempt to stop its development of nuclear weapons. Officials from nations across the globe have seized shipments of raw materials, shut down shell companies and interdicted ships smuggling equipment.

But despite these efforts, last year North Korea tested the most powerful weapons known to humanity: a nuclear device far larger than any it had tested before, and an intercontinental ballistic missile that put much of the world, including the U.S., within range.

President Trump said Wednesday he could send up to 15,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border, which would surpass the number of soldiers currently stationed in Afghanistan.

Speaking to reporters as he left the White House for a campaign rally Wednesday night in Florida, Trump said the number of military personnel on the border "will go up to anywhere between 10,000 and 15,000 military personnel on top of the Border Patrol, ICE, and everybody else at the border."

Essay: Disappearing Privacy

Sep 11, 2014
David Rodriguez / Flickr

Today is the 13th anniversary of the terrorist attacks that brought down planes and buildings in New York; Washington, D.C. and Pennsylvania. In the time since then, laws have been passed, measures have been taken and technology developed in the name of improving our national security.

Earlier this week, the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court upheld the U.S. government’s program that allows it to collect all the telephone records it desires from American phone companies.

Privacy Questions Linger After NSA Surveillance Leak

Jun 18, 2013
Matt Cardy/Getty Images stringer

In the wake of the NSA surveillance leak, many Americans are outraged and asking, "Do we live in a big brother state?"