Schlitz Audubon Nature Center

Susan Bence

Unexpected partnerships are helping the 40-year-old Schlitz Audubon Nature Center manage its 185 acres  along Lake Michigan’s shore in Bayside, Wisconsin.

David Pacifico coordinates research and policy in Cardinal Stritch University's School of Continuing and On-line Learning. He also holds a PhD in Anthropology.

Digging into how people from long ago lived their lives is Pacifico's passion.

Schlitz Audubon Nature Center

The Schlitz Audubon Nature Center hugs the Lake Michigan shoreline a dozen miles north of downtown Milwaukee. Trails crisscross the center’s 185 acres and visitors can find themselves walking through wetlands, forests, restored prairie and along the undeveloped shore of the lake itself.

The nature center’s acreage was formerly a farm for the Schlitz Brewery draft horses. And while the horses are no longer in residence, some of their avian brothers and sisters are, including several birds of prey.

Andrea Merimee

Wednesday, Schlitz Audubon Nature Center will run its first-ever moth identification night and will add its results to a national database.

Actually, counts are going on this week around the globe! It's National Moth Week.

In Milwaukee, Brooke Gilley has taken on the moth counting mission at Schlitz Audubon Nature Center. If anyone can engender warm fuzzy feelings about moths, it’s Gilley.

M Maternowski

In 1996, USGS scientists embarked on a 24 hour inventory of a park in Washington D.C. Their aim was to identify every plant and animal species on the grounds, and the term BioBlitz was coined.

Ellen Censky, now Senior Vice President and Academic Dean of the Milwaukee Public Museum, participated in her first BioBlitz in 1997 in Pittsburgh, PA. When a job took her to the Univeristy of Connecticut she initiated a BioBlitz there. It received national attention.

Censky decided to write a handbook at the time “because I was getting calls from all over the country.”

Schlitz Audubon Nature Center

With temperatures plummeting below zero, we seem to see fewer squirrels and birds out and about. So, we wanted to find out how wildlife copes with the cold.