seniors

Fresh Meals on Wheels

A lot of aging adults fight to stay in their homes. A new pilot program in Sheboygan would allow seniors to do just that. But, many are leaving the offer on the table.

Concordia University is working with Fresh Meals on Wheels in Sheboygan to pilot a new program for seniors living at home. Essentially, there are three home visits.

Halfpoint / Fotolia

According to the AARP, at least 90 percent of people in a recent survey say they want to age in their own home. But sometimes health and mobility issues can make that hope a challenge.

karelnoppe / Fotolia

The old saying goes that nothing is certain but death and taxes. We can add another certainty to that list: our muscles will weaken and even atrophy as we age, unless we take care of them by strength building and exercise. In other words, you really do need to move it, or you will lose it.

m4rco ⏎ / Flickr

From downsizing to health care, there are many difficult issues to sort through as people age. Some of these decisions are exacerbated when financial security is also an issue.

"Elder abuse is a broad area that includes a lot of financial exploitation," SeniorLAW director Matthew Hayes says. Financial abuse can range from telephone scams to family members trying to take money from older relatives.

missty / Fotolia

Baby Boomers have been called the sandwich generation, often caring for their children and aging parents at the same time. Many people struggle to find the right way to talk with their aging parents about some tough family choices.

Many seniors resist a change in housing, even when they know they need to move. "It’s fear of going from a known to an unknown. You know the stores, you know the doctors, you know your neighbors. And then there’s the fear of the uncertainty of where you’re going. So what’s really behind it is not knowing what’s ahead,"Bruce Nemovitz says.

Derek Rickert

Census predictions hold that within 20 years, the percentage of senior citizens in this country will reach a historic high. With this, comes far-reaching implications. Many more people graduating from college today will need to work in fields that relate to older adults.

That fact is the basis for a unique collaboration between UW-Milwaukee’s Helen Bader School of Social Welfare and the St. John’s on the Lake retirement community.

Charles McQuillan / Getty Images

A new report from UW-Milwaukee examines how comfortable older LGBT people feel about aging in the Milwaukee area.

Researcher and social work assistant professor Mark Williams collected the comments of 255 LGBT residents, between the ages of 50 and 89.

His study reveals areas respondents say need extensive improvement, such as housing.

Williams says a significant number of respondents believe they’ll eventually live in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Yet he says most fear they won’t feel safe or comfortable in such a setting.

Erin Toner

This year marks notable anniversaries for the country’s entitlement programs for seniors. Medicare turns 50 and Social Security turns 80. 

Federal leaders continue talking about ways to sustain benefits for older Americans because their numbers are growing.

Milwaukee area seniors offered ideas Monday at the Washington Park Senior Center.

Harold Omeig, who’s 70, says his monthly Social Security check from the federal government is all he has.

Mohammadali F. / Flickr

As we age, our connections to our community can falter or strengthen. Lost connections can especially occur when one lives alone. Islands of Milwaukee is a two-year project designed to help engage senior citizens and others who are living alone.

Rosie O'Beirne / Flickr

It’s not unusual for Milwaukee Magazine to offer a guide to living in Milwaukee.