State of the Union address

President Trump delivered his third State of the Union address Tuesday night, the day before his Senate impeachment trial is scheduled to wrap.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

President Trump is set to deliver his third State of the Union address Tuesday night, less than a day before the U.S. Senate is scheduled to vote on two articles of impeachment against him.

While the scene on Capitol Hill has been tumultuous during the impeachment trial, a senior administration official told reporters last week that Trump's address would use "the great American comeback" as its theme and take an optimistic tone.

Here's what you need to know ahead of tonight's address.

President Trump delivered a wide-ranging State of the Union address Tuesday night that went an hour and 21 minutes. That's the third-longest ever.

So what should we make of Trump's third address to Congress, and in a year when Democrats are gearing up for a crowded primary to decide who will face Trump in 2020?

1. Trump did not acknowledge the new political reality in Washington

The president begged for unity before unleashing a speech that focused squarely on his most controversial policy. A traditional show of support from the speaker of the House turned into a sarcastic instant meme.

Such is politics in 2019.

Annette Elizabeth Allen/ NPR

The former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams delivered the Democratic response to President Trump's State of the Union address. Reporters across the NPR newsroom annotated her remarks, adding context and analysis.

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Updated Wednesday at 1:05 a.m. ET

President Trump used his second State of the Union address to call for bipartisanship and unity, even as he remains at an impasse with Congress over immigration in the shadow of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

Meg Kelly/NPR

President Trump delivered the State of the Union address Tuesday night after a delay due to the government shutdown.

NPR reporters covering the White House, Congress, immigration, national security and more annotated President Trump's remarks live, adding context and analysis.

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Shealah Craighead/Official White House Photo

Millions of Americans will tune in on Feb. 5, as President Donald Trump gives his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress. The speech was delayed after Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi rescinded the official invitation to the president during the partial government shutdown.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

President Trump will deliver his second State of the Union address to Congress on Tuesday night. He's expected to deliver a bipartisan message themed around "choosing greatness," while outlining what the White House calls a "policy agenda both parties can rally behind."

President Trump's second State of the Union address will be delivered Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress with all the usual pomp and circumstance. But the political backdrop is unusual, coming in the aftermath of the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history and on the eve of what could be another vicious fight or even another shutdown.

The fight at the heart of the shutdown — the fight over the president's border wall — remains unresolved with the clock ticking to make a deal.

With the government reopened — at least for now — following a 35-day partial government shutdown, President Trump's State of the Union address has been rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 5.

In a letter sent to the president on Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., wrote that the two had agreed upon the new date next week, after she had postponed her original offer of Jan. 29 amid the shutdown.

Updated at 1:15 a.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday night he won't be looking for an alternative place to give the State of the Union address. Earlier in the day, asked about House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., insisting he could not speak on the House floor until a partial government shutdown is over, the president said, "We'll do something in the alternative."

POOL PHOTO / Getty Images

President Obama delivered what will be the final State of the Union address of his presidency Tuesday night before a joint session of Congress.  There was much build-up to the speech, both in the national media, but also from the White House itself, which advertised the address as diverging from how previous speeches to the nation have gone.

President Obama will deliver his State of the Union address Tuesday night.

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin is the new chairman of the Senate Homeland Security committee.

He hopes the president devotes much of his speech to how he intends to better protect Americans.

"The world is witnessing the growth of Islamic terror, the growth of Isis, the attacks in Sydney and Paris.  This isn't going away.  Americans are looking for policies and leadership that will keep Americans safe and secure, in terms of national security and economic security," Johnson says.

Wisconsin Group Advocates for Higher Minimum Wage

Jan 29, 2014
Photos.com

As was expected, President Obama unveiled his plan to hike the minimum wage for people hired on federal contracts, during the State of the Union address last night. 

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