streetcar

Marti Mikkelson

Plans to expand some Milwaukee streetcar routes have been delayed again. A Common Council Committee decided Tuesday to put the plans on hold while it gathers more public input. Mayor Tom Barrett had pushed for the expansions, especially one that would extend the streetcar to Wisconsin Avenue in time for the Democratic National Convention (DNC) next summer.

Chuck Quirmbach

A failure with counting riders on the downtown Milwaukee streetcar, known as The Hop, is being fixed. That's according to Mayor Tom Barrett. Others are concerned that such a new service as the streetcar has already experienced a significant problem.

Operators of The Hop say infrared sensors that count people coming onto or leaving the streetcar started failing on three of the five cars in early February.

That's important because ridership on The Hop is currently free, so there's no way to tally riders based on fares collected.

Chuck Quirmbach

Updated 3:10 p.m.

The City of Milwaukee says daily ridership on The Hop increased last month, compared to November 2018, the streetcar's initial month of service. But monthly ridership declined slightly in December.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett says the daily December average was 2,453 rides, compared to 2,297 in November.

READ: How The Hop Works

Chuck Quirmbach

Milwaukee's multi-million dollar streetcar — called The Hop — begins operation around 12:45 Friday afternoon. Each streetcar can hold up to 150 passengers and will provide service to about a two-mile loop through the west and east sides of downtown Milwaukee. Rides are free for the first year.   

The new streetcar service, which consists of five different streetcars, is trying to merge old and new technology.

Chuck Quirmbach

If you’ve been traveling in downtown Milwaukee recently, you may have noticed crews conducting test runs on the streetcar. With the streetcar’s initial 2-mile route opening Nov. 2, some people have safety concerns.

Marti Mikkelson

The Milwaukee Streetcar is set to begin operating next fall. You may have noticed all the construction that’s underway for the two-mile loop through downtown – as well as the tracks that have already been laid down. But, support for the service appears to be in doubt, as a new poll shows.

THE MILWAUKEE STREETCAR

The CEO of Potawatomi Hotel & Casino joined Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett on Friday to announce a partnership between the city and the Forest County Potawatomi Community. The agreement calls for the Potawatomi to give $10 million to the city over the course of 12 years. The mayor's office says the money "will be used to offset operating costs and will include free rides for all for the first 12 months of the streetcar's operation."

mariordo59 / Flickr

There are many things brewing in downtown Milwaukee. Perhaps the most notable project this summer has been the laying of the tracks for the new Milwaukee Streetcar, which has torn up roads throughout downtown and the Third Ward.

Residents have many lingering questions about the new streetcar, but the most persistent one seems to be: Why? Like many cities, Milwaukee once had a streetcar system that was removed in the 1950s. 

Bucks Arena, Streetcar Shape Local Job Training

Aug 25, 2017
Amanda Becker

The skyline in Milwaukee is changing, and with that comes hundreds of jobs. Though many of those positions don't require a college degree, they do require specific sets of skills. So, a local nonprofit has teamed up with construction firms to create programs to train city residents for that work.

For the new Milwaukee Bucks area, Carrie Enders of the contractor Wall-tech says her company had to get creative. “We did not have any qualified workers and we had this requirement with the City of Milwaukee."

Susan Bence

If you drive around downtown Milwaukee, or will for Summerfest, you may find all the torn up streets frustrating. Much of the construction is due to the city’s new streetcar. 

The project is in full swing, with workers laying tracks along some sections of the two mile route. It’s expected to begin operating in late 2018. We asked a few people what all the orange barrels mean to them, today.

LaToya Dennis

Construction crews are hard at work in Milwaukee building the city’s new streetcar. Welding is underway, and workers will soon start digging trenches for the tracks.

It’s a cold spring day, but the weather isn’t putting a damper on the progress of the Milwaukee streetcar. Sparks are flying.

THE MILWAUKEE STREETCAR

It appears less likely that the Milwaukee County Transit System will operate the city’s new streetcar. The Common Council on Tuesday overwhelmingly said no to extending the deadline for bids.

Construction of the initial two-mile track through downtown Milwaukee is expected to begin next month. But the Common Council has not yet decided who will operate the streetcar.

One entity that’s interested is the Milwaukee County Transit System. It was hoping to win more time to submit a bid as the deadline is next Tuesday.

Mitch Teich

The first shipment of rails for the Milwaukee streetcar has arrived.  The 80-foot sticks of rail are being delivered by truck and staged along St. Paul Avenue, west of the Milwaukee Intermodal Station.

According to signage from the City of Milwaukee, the U.S.-made rails will be welded together using a technique called "electric flash-butt welding" to create 320-foot long segments which will be placed into the ground.

Work to begin installing rails into the 2.1-mile Phase 1 route could begin within a few weeks, with opening of the route expected in late 2018.

The Milwaukee Streetcar

Like it or not, the Milwaukee Streetcar is becoming a reality. Groundbreaking is essentially underway, as We Energies is moving utility lines along the two mile route through downtown. Service is slated to begin in 2018. But, arguments continue surfacing.

Perhaps the person who feels most passionately about the Milwaukee Streetcar is Mayor Tom Barrett. The project has been on his radar since he first took office in 2004.

Atlanta Streetcar

Modern day streetcar systems are popping up in places such as Dallas, Portland and Kansas City with hopes of sparking economic revival. Milwaukee leaders desire similar results here as they prepare to debut a system in 2018. But, not every project has lived up to its hype.

It took years longer than projected for the streetcar system in Washington D.C. to finally begin operating.

Martin Austermuhle says problems started back in 2007, when the district first began construction. 

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