UWM Today

Since its opening, UWM’s Lubar Entrepreneurship Center has attracted UWM students from across the campus who want to know more about innovation, problem-solving and creativity – the foundation of how entrepreneurs think. When the coronavirus pandemic began, all of the various programs had to move to an online environment.

  

Climate change, pollution and over demand are just a few of the challenges that are forcing us to rethink how we use and conserve water. Both globally and in the water-rich Great Lakes region, there's also a need to train the next generation of scientists and technicians to work in the water industry.

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On today’s Chancellor’s Report, we continue our periodic look at issues of injustice and inequity. We talk with UWM’s Chancellor Mark Mone and Dr. Joan Prince, vice chancellor of Global Inclusion and Engagement, about UWM’s progress on addressing racial equity and social issues on campus. And, now that Election Day has passed, we discuss how higher education will fare in this post-election environment.

Each year, more than 150,000 Americans learn their cancer has spread — or metastasized — to their brain. The UWM App Brewery has partnered with Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin Cancer Network to develop a smartphone app that streamlines communication among doctors treating these patients. The app not only allows a team of doctors and specialists to reach a consensus on the patient’s care within hours but also recommends best treatment options.

For decades, low-income and minority communities across the United States were intentionally cut off from lending and investment through a system known as redlining. The practice started in the 1930s and lasted decades before being declared illegal. But the impact of redlining remains today as many neighborhoods suffer not only from reduced wealth and greater poverty but from lower life expectancy and a higher incidence of chronic diseases.

Over the past 40 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of inmates in America’s prisons and jails. Today more than 2 million people are imprisoned in this country — a 500% increase since 1978. There are many consequences of the mass incarceration in the United States, which has affected families and communities nationwide.

As we move into the homestretch of the presidential election, the political rhetoric is heating up, especially in a battleground state like Wisconsin. While we can all switch the channel or turn off the TV when we have our fill of political advertising, it is not easy knowing how to handle those uncomfortable moments when we are face-to-face with someone we disagree with.

For the past four years, UWM scientists have been involved in one of the largest studies ever conducted into the brain development of adolescents. Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the study is tracking nearly 12,000 kids across the United States — about 400 of them here in southeastern Wisconsin — to see how their brains mature. It’s a fascinating story we have been following here on UWM Today for some time.

We are all getting older with every birthday we celebrate. But we don’t all age the same way. And how we approach aging affects not only us but the people around us.

On this edition of UWM Today, we talk to a UWM English professor who has just published a book about getting older and finding lessons in films, literature and works of art. Ellyn Lem’s new book is titled Gray Matters: Finding Meaning in the Stories of Later Life.

The toll of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused enormous pain and suffering – both in terms of the number of people infected and killed by the virus and those who have lost their jobs. It’s estimated that more than 30 million people continue to be unemployed in our country because of the effects the pandemic has had on society.

The racial equity protests around the country sparked by the death of George Floyd have shed new light on longstanding issues of race and inequality in the United States. In Milwaukee, the protests have once again highlighted the impact of the segregationist practices that were once common in the area and that have contributed to socioeconomic inequality for people of color in the region, especially for the Black population.

Lauren Sigfusson

On today’s Chancellor’s Report, we talk with UWM Chancellor Mark Mone about UWM’s Fall 2020 semester reopening amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the racial and social justice protests taking place here in southern Wisconsin and throughout the nation.

As we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, important environmental research continues to take place at top tier research universities across America like UW-Milwaukee.

Lauren Sigfusson

Health care practitioners spend a lot of time gathering data. Good information about patients is one of the key elements to providing good care. But unfortunately, hospitals are not always able to implement a data-monitoring system. With different levels of data access from hospital to hospital, errors can happen that can impact the health outcomes of patients.

Lauren Sigfusson

As the Democratic National Convention is about to get underway here in Milwaukee, the deep disappointment of what might have been is inescapable. The prospect of hosting more than 50,000 visitors during the convention and showcasing the city and state to audiences around the world evaporated with the decision to have a nearly all virtual event because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But, small as it may be, the convention will still go on with Democrats formally nominating Joe Biden to be the party’s candidate in the November election.

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