Bubbler Talk

What’s got you scratching your head about Milwaukee and the region? Bubbler Talk is a series that puts your curiosity front and center.

How it works: You ask, we investigate, and together we unveil the answers.

Ask away: What have you always wanted to know about the Milwaukee area's people, places, or culture that you want WUWM to explore?

Participate in the process and submit your question below.

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Ann-Elise Henzl Reporter Milwaukee Public Radio

A weekend brunch staple: the Bloody Mary. The vodka and tomato juice drink has become known for its garnishes, which tower over other cocktails. Garnishes in Milwaukee may include asparagus spears, jumbo shrimp, even a piece of brisket or a miniature hamburger.

WISCONSIN LGBT HISTORY PROJECT

What have you always wanted to know about Milwaukee and the region?

For this week's Bubbler Talk, WUWM tackles this question submitted by Hannah Kaytonah:  Is Walker’s Point really a ‘gay’ neighborhood?

Marge Pitrof

With the start of the new school year, WUWM's Bubbler Talk probes a school-related question. Asker Mike Osowski wants to know the story behind Bay View High School's many stone faces.

More than 160 of them adorn the building, with most along its upper edge, but others around the doorways. 

There may be even more concrete faces, those were just the ones we were able to count. Others may be hidden, due to the addition MPS tacked onto the school in the mid-1970s.

Is There a Waterfall in Menomonee Falls?

Jul 22, 2016
Nancy Greifenhagen / Menomonee Falls Historical Society

This week's Bubbler Talk question is a simple one. Danica Herritz asked: Is or was there a falls (some sort of waterfall) in Menomonee Falls?

Lake Effect turned to Nancy Greifenhagen, board member of the Menomonee Falls Historical Society, for the answer.

Greifenhagen says there are actually two waterfalls in the Waukesha County village.

Marti Mikkelson

This week’s Bubbler Talk inquiry comes from Beth Gehred. She wanted to know how Milwaukee's public tavern is doing.

The tavern Gehred is referring to is the Riverwest Public House Cooperative, located on E. Locust Street in the Riverwest neighborhood. 

On the day WUWM's Marti Mikkelson and Gehred met at the packed bar, a couple of young men were playing dice, while several dozen other people were socializing with friends.

Mitch Teich

It's a question that many of us have probably thought of while we're out for a walk on a beautiful summer evening in Milwaukee.  You bend down to tie your shoe, and there, next to your foot, is a date, stamped into the sidewalk like in the picture above.

Courtesy of Tom Fehring

Whether you've just moved to a new city or have been a life-long resident, sometimes street names can catch your attention.

This week's Bubbler Talk question came from Whitefish Bay resident Ellen Parmelee who asked WUWM: "When I moved to Whitefish Bay two years ago onto Henry Clay Street, I wondered why a street there would be named for Henry Clay?”

Susan Bence

This week's Bubbler Talk question comes from Spencer Hoyt, who asked WUWM: Why is the 425 million year old Schoonmaker Reef so important to metro Milwaukee?

The coral reef existed when North America was covered with water hundreds of millions of years ago, and then it fossilized.

Maayan Silver

Trying a city's signature foods is a must for visitors and locals alike. In New Orleans, you'd probably be on the search for a beignet; in Philly, a cheese steak; in Texas, barbecue. So, what's Milwaukee's?

Tom Targos of Salem, Wisc., took that question to WUWM's Bubbler Talk and asked: "Chicago has deep-dish pizza and Chicago-style hot dogs ... but what are some of the foods or dishes with a genesis in Milwaukee?"

Milwaukee Housing Authority

This week’s Bubbler Talk is all about buildings--round ones.

Wendy Necklet asked WUWM: What's the deal with all the round buildings? 

Well, for this story what better place to start than one of the city’s most iconic hotels, the Pfister.

Peter Mortensen is the concierge and the unofficial hotel historian. He’s worked here for about 30 years and believe me when I say he’s a really, really smart guy. “I’ve never run across an obscure fact I didn’t like,” he says.

Michelle Maternowski

The ready access Milwaukee has to fresh water - lots and lots of fresh water - seems like an obvious reason that so many breweries chose to open up shop here. Of course, the thousands of German immigrants didn't hurt, either.

Marge Pitrof

Steve Liszewski first noticed South Milwaukee's unique house numbering and street naming system when he was young and his parents taught him how to travel the county by bus.

He understood Greater Milwaukee’s address numbering system and became familiar with its street names – until he crossed the border into South Milwaukee. Then everything was different. So, he turned to WUWM and asked why.

Before we answer, let's explore what makes South Milwaukee's addresses different from most others in Milwaukee County.

Ian Sane / Flickr

Katie Gnau recently moved to Shorewood from Chicago. And when her daughter came home from school one day, Katie noticed she had picked up a new word for a familiar item. So, she asked WUWM's Bubbler Talk:  Why does everyone around here call that a Bubbler, anyway?

WUWM has launched a new series and is inviting YOU to participate. We want to know what's got you scratching your head about the Milwaukee area.

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