Election

Updated at 1:26 p.m. ET

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke is running for president, hoping to build on the momentum the Democrat generated in a Senate contest last year.

Maayan Silver

Updated 4:05 p.m.

Democrats chose Milwaukee to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention (DNC). It was announced Monday that the Cream City beat out Houston and Miami to host the convention.

Here's something Democrats thought they knew during the last presidential campaign: Wisconsin was safe. It was a lock for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. But when the votes were counted, it was a stunning upset for Republican Donald Trump.

In 2020, Democrats apparently aren't taking the state for granted.

Even though the first nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire are some 11 months away, and with Wisconsin's primary not until April 7 of next year, the campaign stops have already begun.

This is the largest Democratic presidential field in decades. In the mix are figures from across the country: mayors, senators, governors, a venture capitalist and even a spiritual guru.

It's a big change from 2016 when a total of five major candidates ran in the Democratic primary.

For Democrats, it's also one of the most consequential elections ever, with the opportunity to deny President Trump re-election after a term that has outraged the left. The historically diverse field of candidates has a wide range of approaches on how to win in 2020 and beat Trump.

Josh Kaul will become Wisconsin's new attorney general in just more than six weeks, after defeating Republican incumbent Brad Schimel. It'll be the first time in a decade that the justice department will be led by a Democrat. And this likely means changes at the agency.

Kaul will be Wisconsin's chief legal representative and able to decide how to enforce state laws and defend statutes. He'll also choose whether to join national investigations into issues of statewide importance and decide whether to join challenges to federal government policies.

midterm-elections-wisconsin-voter-turnout-up
Darren Hauck

Wisconsin had the second highest voter turnout in the country on Election Day, just two weeks ago. While people across the board showed up at the polls, there are subsets of the population where decreased participation was seen.

Of registered voters in Milwaukee, 74 percent participated in the 2018 midterm elections. That marks an increase of 8,000 voters across the city when compared to the 2014 midterm elections. Milwaukee Election Commission Executive Director Neil Albrecht says it’s great that so many people voted, but that increase was not seen across the city.

Update Nov. 19

Almost two weeks after the midterm elections, Wisconsin finally knows who its new attorney general will be. Republican incumbent Attorney General Brad Schimel conceded Monday to Democrat Josh Kaul. 

According to the AP, canvassed vote totals show Schimel lost by just over 17,000 votes. Even though Kaul's win was less than 1 percentage point and state law would allow a recount, Schimel said he wouldn't seek a recount.

Original Story Nov. 7 

Despite frenetically campaigning, rallying and tweeting support for Republican candidates in the lead-up to the midterms, President Trump didn't take any responsibility for the GOP's losses in those elections in an interview with Fox News' Chris Wallace that aired Sunday.

"I have people that won't vote unless I'm on the ballot, OK?" Trump said, later noting, "My name wasn't on the ballot."

Updated at 2:58 p.m. ET

Votes are still being counted in several House races. But the AP has now called another race in New Jersey, projecting Democrat Andy Kim the winner in the suburban Philadelphia 3rd Congressional District over incumbent Republican Tom MacArthur.

That means, more than a week after Election Day, Democrats have increased their House gains to a net of 34 seats — and, when all the vote is counted, they may get to 39.

Make no mistake: That is a very big wave.

SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES

Last week, Tony Evers cleared a huge hurdle, winning the race for governor. But the Democrat’s biggest challenges are to come. The first is within a few months when Evers will have to present his first biennial budget proposal. According to a Wisconsin Policy Forum report, he'll have to find $2 billion just to keep current programs in place.

Hello! We know there's a lot of news out there, but we're bringing you an education-centric take on the midterms, with big results in some key states.

Arizona

Emily Files

It’s a record-breaking year for school referendums in Wisconsin. Unofficial results show voters backed 94 percent of ballot questions in Tuesday’s election, including all in southeastern Wisconsin.

Counting elections earlier in 2018, more than $2 billion in school referendum spending has been approved this year. That surpasses the previous record of about $1.7 billion in 2016.  

President Trump claimed some personal victories in the 2018 midterm results, and as he ticked them off at a news conference on Wednesday he might as well have been walking through the Electoral College map for 2020.

Updated Nov. 18 at 3:40 p.m. ET

President Trump often employs the power of positive thinking when it comes to his own shortcomings, choosing to promote the wins rather than wallow or search for lessons in the losses. And so it was with his claim of a "very close to complete victory" in Tuesday's election, even though Democrats took control of the House.

Darren Hauck/Getty Images

Democratic Governor-elect Tony Evers says he's busy putting together his transition team. His comments came after Gov. Scott Walker conceded defeat Wednesday afternoon. The Republican had won statewide office twice, surviving a recall election. So, why couldn't Walker pull off a win this time around?

UW-Madison political science professor David Canon says that Evers won, in part, because of demographics — namely age, gender and education.

1. What was behind Evers' Win?

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