Election

Marti Mikkelson

Voters and advocacy groups are suing Wisconsin’s top election officials, charging they failed to take needed action to allow safe and accessible voting during the state’s April 7 election. The suit seeks to ensure the same problems don't occur when voters go to the polls in November.

The plaintiffs want mail-in ballot request forms sent to all voters, more polling places, and a comprehensive voter education campaign, among other changes.

BlackPaint Studios

If you've driven through the intersection of First Street and Pittsburgh Avenue in Milwaukee's Walker's Point neighborhood during the last few weeks, you might have seen a bold statement painted on the windows of BlackPaint Studios: Wisconsin's Pandemic Primary = Crime Against Humanity. 

Trump-Backed Tom Tiffany Wins Wisconsin Congressional Race

May 12, 2020
Courtesy of Tom Tiffany

Updated Wednesday at 8:13 a.m.:

Tom Tiffany, a state senator endorsed by President Donald Trump, easily won a special congressional election Tuesday in a heavily conservative, rural Wisconsin district, cheering Republicans even as Democrats argued the victory revealed vulnerabilities for the president among his base.

Wisconsin Set To Hold More Elections During Coronavirus Pandemic

May 7, 2020
Coburn Dukehart / Wisconsin Watch

Tamia Fowlkes of Milwaukee was among thousands of voters in Wisconsin who reluctantly went to the polls on April 7. Fowlkes had voted absentee — like more than a million other voters in the state — but then helped her grandfather cast his ballot in person after the state Supreme Court ruled that Gov. Tony Evers lacked the authority to delay the election because of the pandemic.

Teran Powell

Updated at 3:33 p.m. CT

Wisconsin’s presidential primary election held last month in the face of the coronavirus pandemic drew concern from doctors, voters, poll workers and politicians who warned that having thousands of people leave their homes to cast ballots would further spread the highly contagious virus.

Now well beyond the 14-day incubation period for COVID-19, and with a Tuesday special congressional election in northern Wisconsin looming, it remains largely unknown just how many people contracted the virus at the polls on April 7.

Courtesy of Tearman Spencer

The Milwaukee city attorney’s race doesn’t always get a lot of attention. But this year, in an upset, Tearman Spencer beat out long-time incumbent Grant Langley, who was in office for 36 years. Spencer ran on the platform of change and made history by being elected as Milwaukee’s first black city attorney.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history in Milwaukee’s spring election. This is part three: Milwaukee City Attorney Tearman Spencer.

Updated at 5:59 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains graphic descriptions of an alleged sexual assault.

More than a month after being publicly accused of sexual assault by a former Senate staffer in the 1990s, former Vice President Joe Biden says the allegations "aren't true. This never happened."

Courtesy of Jackson Weber

Voters made history in Wisconsin’s April 7 spring election by voting during a global pandemic. They also made history by electing the first black Milwaukee County executive and Milwaukee city attorney, and the first Latina and openly bisexual Milwaukee alderwoman.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history. This is part two: 8th District Alderwoman JoCasta Zamarripa.

Courtesy of David Crowley

Voters made history in Wisconsin’s April 7 spring election by voting during a global pandemic. They also made history by electing the first black Milwaukee County executive and Milwaukee city attorney, and the first Latina and openly bisexual Milwaukee alderwoman.

In a three-part series, WUWM is bringing conversations from each of the candidates who made history. This is part one: Milwaukee County Executive-elect David Crowley.

Chuck Quirmbach

Updated at 2:35 p.m. CT

There are no plans to postpone or otherwise alter a special congressional election in Wisconsin that is less than two weeks away, even though more than 50 people who voted in person or worked the polls during the state's presidential primary this month have tested positive for COVID-19.

Election officials nationwide are preparing for what may the highest election turnout in modern history in the middle of a pandemic. In response, several states will be turning to a relatively new and untested form of Internet-based voting to aid the voters who may have the most trouble getting to the polls.

Teran Powell

Forty people in Milwaukee County may have become infected with the coronavirus as a result of participating in Wisconsin elections on April 7.

>>No Spike, But No Certainty On Fallout Of Wisconsin Election
>>The Latest WUWM & NPR Coronavirus Coverage

Andy Manis / Getty Images

At least 15 poll workers and voters who participated in Wisconsin’s April 7 election have confirmed cases of COVID-19, according to state Department of Health Services Deputy Secretary Julie Willems Van Dijk.

“We have correlation they voted and they were at the polls, but we do not have causation. We don't have a comparison group in order to make that kind of determination. We'd have to have a comparison group of where all the people who have tested negative whether they voted or not," Willems Van Dijk said in a news briefing on Wednesday.

At least seven people may have become infected with the coronavirus as a result of Wisconsin's controversial decision to go forward with in-person voting for its April 7 election, Milwaukee's top public health officer said Monday.

"As of today, we have identified seven individuals that contracted, or at least it appears, COVID-19 through election-related activities," said Jeanette Kowalik, the city's health commissioner.

Teran Powell

Updated at 1:02 p.m. CT

Health officials in Wisconsin said they have identified at least seven people who appear to have contracted the coronavirus from participating in the April 7 election, the first such cases following in-person voting that was held despite widespread concern about the public health risks.

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