Election

Maayan Silver

Former Vice President Joe Biden became president-elect Saturday, as Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes put him over the 270 he needed to win.

In the wake of Biden’s win, there were intermittent celebrations of honking on Lincoln Memorial Drive and Prospect Avenue on Milwaukee’s East Side. Elsewhere, people who support Biden and who support Donald Trump were out on Saturday to have their voices heard.

Updated on Tuesday at 3:15 p.m. ET

President-elect Joe Biden called for healing and cooperation in his victory speech on Saturday night, striking an optimistic tone about the prospects for a renewed and reunited America.

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

California Sen. Kamala Harris will become the next vice president of the United States, shattering another racial and gender barrier in American politics, at the end of a bruising presidential race that further exposed a bitterly divided electorate.

Updated at 1:54 p.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden has been elected the 46th president of the United States, narrowly emerging victorious from a contentious White House campaign that stretched days past election night, as vote tallies in several swing states were slowed by an unprecedented surge in mail-in ballots.

Aides to President Trump have been counseling him this week that his legal options to try to contest the election are limited, but Trump wants to fight it out, a former campaign adviser who remains in touch with key players told NPR.

"It's dawning on him," the former adviser said, speaking on condition of anonymity to comment on private conversations. "He never thought he could lose ... and those of us who are in Trump World, we actually never believed he could lose."

Teran Powell / WUWM

While official election results are still being tabulated, we do know a little more about voter turnout. Milwaukeeans and Wisconsinites alike showed up at the polls in droves — by mail, through early voting and on Election Day.

Jo Panuwat D / stock.adobe.com

As election night stretched into the early morning of Nov. 4, the election results in Wisconsin began to shift. It was something that many election observers expected: in-person voting, generally counted first, would favor President Donald Trump. Mail-in voting, counted later, would favor former Vice President Joe Biden. 

But as the tide began to turn in favor of Biden, prominent Republicans, including Trump, began making claims of fraud. These claims run the gamut from basic misunderstandings of how elections are conducted in Wisconsin to outright conspiracy theories. 

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Updated Saturday at 11:11 a.m. CT

Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, said Friday that half the country will not accept the outcome of the presidential election if Democrat Joe Biden wins.

Johnson, a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump, also refused to say if he thought the election was legitimate, while admitting he had no proof of any illegal activity.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger told reporters that the state will conduct a recount given the razor-thin margin between former Vice President Joe Biden and President Trump.

"The focus for our office and for the county elections officials for now remains on making sure that every legal vote is counted and recorded accurately," Raffensperger said.

"As we are closing in on a final count, we can begin to look toward our next steps. With a margin that small, there will be a recount in Georgia," he predicted.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

A Wisconsin election official is addressing the red pen controversy raised by President Donald Trump's reelection campaign.

Trump may ask for a recount of Tuesday's result in Wisconsin that shows him trailing Democrat Joe Biden by about 20,000 votes.

>>Trump Wants A Recount In Wisconsin. How Would It Work?

Three days after Election Day, Democratic nominee Joe Biden took narrow leads in Pennsylvania and Georgia, according to The Associated Press, putting him on the cusp of a victory in the Electoral College.

Early Friday, Biden took a 5,500-vote lead in the Keystone State, after trailing President Trump there for days. He also took a narrow lead in Georgia, giving the Democratic nominee the lead in a state that hasn't voted for a Democrat for president since Bill Clinton was on the ticket in 1992.

Support for President Trump increased in 2020 in many of the U.S. counties that lost lives at the highest rate to COVID-19, according to an NPR analysis.

Of the 100 counties with the highest COVID-19 death rates per capita, 68 had a higher proportion of votes cast for Trump this cycle than they did in 2016. This includes both Republican-leaning counties and counties that supported Joe Biden.

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Scott Olson / Getty Images

On Wednesday, Joe Biden won Wisconsin, gaining its 10 electoral votes. But once again, the race was very close, with the unofficial results giving Biden the lead by about 20,000 votes. This is a familiar scenario to what we saw in the 2016 election when President Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton by roughly the same margin. 

Scott Olson / Getty Images

In 2016, then-candidate Donald Trump’s ascension to the White House surprised many Americans. Many people were positively sure that Hillary Clinton would win the election and one of the major reasons was polling.

Polls showed Clinton up by comfortable margins in many states and showed her handily winning the election. Although she secured the popular vote, she failed to win the electoral college, leading many pollsters to re-analyze how they do their work.

burdun / stock.adobe.com

This year’s election was unprecedented in the way people voted and how long anxious voters have had to wait for election results. Wisconsin went blue for Vice President Joe Biden by a narrow margin. But, before the call was even made, President Donald Trump’s campaign requested a recount of the votes cast. 

Susan Bence

As talk of a Joe Biden presidential win in Wisconsin clashed with Donald Trump’s demand for recounts Wednesday, some community leaders gathered in downtown Milwaukee in celebration and to make it clear the voice of every voter is essential to our democracy.

Not long after The Associated Press and other news outlets declared Wednesday that Democrat Joe Biden had won Wisconsin's 10 electoral votes, the Trump campaign announced it would ask for a recount in the state.

The margin separating Biden and Trump in what is one of the nation's most contested swing states is roughly 20,000 votes, or less than 1%. It was absentee ballots in the cities of Milwaukee, Green Bay and Kenosha, added to county totals Wednesday morning, that appear to have put Biden on top.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

Updated Thursday at 2:41 p.m. CT

Joe Biden has defeated President Donald Trump in battleground Wisconsin, securing the state’s 10 electoral votes and reclaiming a key part of the blue wall that slipped away from Democrats four years ago.

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The Toidi / stock.adobe.com

Wisconsin followed the nationwide trend this year with record mail-in and early voting. But will those voter trends continue into future election years or is this a fluke in the time of COVID-19?

If there is a shift in voter trends, is now the time for lawmakers and election officials to look at policies and laws in place around early and mail-in voting?

JOE RAEDLE, DREW ANGERER / GETTY IMAGES

Editor's note: This piece was published before the Associated Press declared Joe Biden the winner of Wisconsin. Currently, President Donald Trump's campaign is requesting a recount for the state.    

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s campaign manager Bill Stepien says the president plans to “immediately” request a recount in the battleground state of Wisconsin, where the race remains close.

In Wisconsin, if a race is within 1 percentage point, the trailing candidate can force a recount.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Wisconsin Democrats waited anxiously on Wednesday to see if they had blocked a Republican attempt to build legislative supermajorities that would negate Gov. Tony Evers’ veto powers and allow them to advance their agenda at will over the upcoming session.

>>2020 Wisconsin Election Results

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Donald Trump and Joe Biden were locked early Wednesday in a razor-thin race in Wisconsin as vote-counting stretched into the predawn hours and the nation’s eyes turned to the same Midwestern battlegrounds that decided the election four years ago.

With nearly all votes counted, Biden had a lead of sixth-tenths of a percentage point over Trump, a margin narrow enough to allow Trump to request a recount if it stands.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The United States woke up the morning after Election Day not knowing who will be president for the next four years. It's not unprecedented, and with a slew of mail-in ballots to process, several key states are working to finish counting.

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Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

Republicans appear poised to retain a narrow Senate majority after winning a number of tough races and with others remaining too close to call.

The GOP currently holds a 53-47 seat majority (with two independents — Angus King of Maine and Bernie Sanders of Vermont — caucusing with Democrats).

Election Day itself went off far more smoothly than many election officials would have predicted seven months ago, as the pandemic took hold in the middle of primary season.

But for months, those officials warned that the expected influx of mail-in votes this year could mean a longer wait before the winner of the presidency was known.

As Nov. 3 turned into Nov. 4, it became clear that's exactly what was happening.

Well, we still don't know who the president-elect is.

Is there a less-surprising outcome for 2020?

Here are six takeaways from one of the strangest election nights in recent history:

1. This is going to go on a while

This election is now coming down to the former Blue Wall states that President Trump toppled in 2016 — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. We won't know results perhaps for days, because Wisconsin and Pennsylvania couldn't start processing mail-in votes until Election Day, and Michigan could only start Monday.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

The 2020 presidential election remained up in the air early Wednesday after tight races, strong turnout and record amounts of mail-in voting left millions of legitimate votes still to be counted, and races in six key states too close to call.

Democratic candidate Joe Biden urged patience until "every vote is counted," but President Trump railed against the extra time required to count the ballots, falsely accusing Democrats of trying to steal the election from him.

View live results for the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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