WUWM: Race & Ethnicity Reporting

Race and ethnicity impacts so much. In a place as diverse as metro-Milwaukee, news fails to capture thousands of stories, including the unexpected or positive ones.

You can help WUWM’s Race & Ethnicity Reporter Teran Powell discover and tell those stories by sharing your question below.

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Teran Powell

If you plan to visit the Milwaukee Art Museum in February, you can expect to be immersed in Haitian culture — by watching performances, or creating your own Haitian-inspired art. The museum is using Haitian dance, music and storytelling to celebrate Black History Month.

Teran Powell

Schools across the country are participating in the second annual national Black Lives Matter at School Week. It includes events and lesson plans centered around affirming the lives of black students. And Milwaukee Public Schools has joined in, with its own Black Lives Matter Week of Action.

If you ask a group of people what it means to be an American, you might get a different answer from each person.

That’s what Race & Ethnicity reporter Teran Powell is exploring for people from underrepresented groups in our series, I’m An American.

This time, she talks to a Hmong woman whose family journey to the United States tells a similar story of many Hmong families who came to this country in search of new opportunities.

Teran Powell

Milwaukee's 53206 ZIP code incarcerates the highest rate of African-American men in the United States — a statistic that disproportionately affects African-American families that live in those neighborhoods. 

Those numbers personally affected Beverly and Baron Walker’s family — Baron Walker was incarcerated for more than 20 years.

Robert and Talbot Trudeau/Flickr

Monday the country commemorates the legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. Milwaukee has been celebrating King for 35 years with events at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts

Social injustices in America came into sharp focus on Aug. 28, 1963. On that day, thousands gathered at the Washington Monument, and more around their radios and TV sets, to hear the King deliver his now famous “I Have A Dream” speech.

Teran Powell

If you ask a group of people what it means to be an American, you might get a different answer from each person. For instance, responses based on someone's political beliefs, family history, military record, or other life experience.

But what does it mean to be an American for people from underrepresented groups in an era when civility and tolerance are sometimes in short supply?

Corey Fells

A Milwaukee photographer has given minority women from the city a chance to make their voices heard  — through pictures. Corey Fells created the "100 Womxn Project," which is currently on display at the Museum of Wisconsin Art in Washington County.

The exhibition features photos of millennial minority women  — people Fells says may rarely get a chance to share their perspectives on life.

Jeff Neira/ABC via Getty Images

In 2018, issues regarding race and ethnicity in the state of Wisconsin made headlines often. As we head into the new year, let's recap of some of the top stories from the last 12 months.

The police encounter with Milwaukee Bucks shooting guard, Sterling Brown, happened nearly a year ago, but it’s one that’s still fresh in the minds of many Milwaukeeans.

Wisconsin Historical Society

There’s a creative new way for Native American students to learn about their culture thanks to a coloring book series on Ojibwe traditions, which is by a Wisconsin author. Writer and illustrator Cassie Brown hopes her coloring book will prevent Native American kids from experiencing what she did.

Brown grew up in the Keweenaw Bay Ojibwe Community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. She says she never saw much representation of American Indian culture in her schools — and it was painful.

KEITH ALLISON/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Updated at 3:52 p.m.

A former Milwaukee police officer who was fired for racially insensitive social media posts appealed his termination during a two-day hearing before the Fire and Police Commission. But he will not be getting his job back, as the commission upheld the decision to fire him.

In January, Erik Andrade was one of several Milwaukee police officers involved in a controversial altercation with Milwaukee Bucks player Sterling Brown.

Teran Powell

Marquette University hosted a summit Thursday meant to help young black, Latino and Native American men succeed in school — and life. The event theme was developing brotherhood among young men of color in Milwaukee and participants came from public schools across the city.

midnight-basetball-league-milwaukee
Teran Powell

Milwaukee's Midnight Basketball League is wrapping up its latest season. But the program's impact on the lives of the players is much bigger than having a safe place to play basketball.

On a recent Wednesday night, groups of young men filed into Bradley Technology and Trade High School on Milwaukee’s south side for the Midnight Basketball League. The first game of the night was set to begin at 8, followed by games at 9, 10 and 11.

Teran Powell

Young people in Wisconsin are helping lead the charge this election season with a message for everyone to get out and vote. Here in Milwaukee, that means going to door to door asking people if they plan to vote and providing voter guides with information on the candidates.

Some of those leaders are young people of color. This past Saturday, dozens of high school and college students spent part of their weekend canvasing different neighborhoods to make sure people get out to vote.

Stories Matter Media LLC

The documentary Circles highlights the need for juvenile justice reform — with a focus on one family's story.

The film, which is featured at the Milwaukee Film Festival, follows school counselor Eric Butler. He does restorative justice work with youth in an Oakland school — giving kids that have dealt with the trauma of the system or their environment a safe space to be heard.

Teran Powell

A whirlwind of events has surrounded Shorewood High School’s planned production of To Kill A Mockingbird. The superintendent of the Shorewood School District, Bryan Davis, addressed members of the media Wednesday afternoon to confirm that the school would part ways with the idea of putting on the show.

Following pushback for the play’s use of the n-word, it went from being a three-night event, to a one-night showing followed by a community talkback session.

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