Beats Me: What Questions Do You Have For WUWM's Beat Reporters?

Innovation. Race and ethnicity. Environment. Education. These are the huge topics WUWM's beat reporters tackle every day. These issues are so big, it can be hard to decide what to dig into and where to begin.

So, we want to hear from you — our community.

Beats Me answers your questions about how education, the environment, race and innovation impacts life in southeastern Wisconsin.

Put your thinking cap on and submit your questions.

Innovation

It seems like every day there are breakthroughs in science, medicine and technology. But what do those advancements mean for you? WUWM’s Innovation Reporter Chuck Quirmbach will answer your questions, and make the difficult easier to grasp.

Submit your questions to Chuck below.

_

» Explore Chuck's Innovation Reporting

Race & Ethnicity

Race and ethnicity impacts so much. In a place as diverse as metro-Milwaukee, news fails to capture thousands of stories, including the unexpected or positive ones.

You can help WUWM’s Race & Ethnicity Reporter Teran Powell discover and tell those stories by sharing your question below.

_

» Read Teran's Race & Ethnicity Reporting

Education

Education news is often mired in discussions about big issues — policies, budgets, political fights. WUWM’s Education Reporter Emily Files also wants to tell student’s stories and hear from parents, teachers and others helping kids succeed.

What are you curious about when it comes to education in the Milwaukee area? What do you think is missing from the education conversation in this region?

Help Emily by submitting your question below.

_

» Read Emily's Education Reporting

The Environment

Many of us are environmentally aware — many recycle, some conserve water, you might ride a bike to work. But we do face profound environmental challenges.

Help WUWM’s Environmental Reporter Susan Bence dig deeper into the issues you are most concerned about.

_

» Explore Susan's Environmental Stories

Teran Powell / WUWM

The American Psychological Association defines trauma as an emotional response to a terrible event like a natural disaster, an accident or a rape. But trauma can have many “flavors,” according to Joshua Mersky, Ph.D.

He’s a professor of social work in the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare at UWM. He says, "Typically speaking, we’re talking about profound adversities that have long lasting consequences."

Susan Bence

An estimated 900,000 Wisconsin households rely on private wells for drinking water. It seems with every passing day, we learn wells are being impacted by contaminants — from manure to PFAS — putting families’ health at risk. Some people feel there's not enough support when they have to deal with a contaminated well.

READ: PFAS Concern Remains High In Marinette

Chuck Quirmbach

More companies are pushing to build large solar energy farms in Wisconsin. The state's Public Service Commission is expected to vote soon on a proposed 1,200-acre solar project west of the city of Jefferson, in Jefferson County.  

Meanwhile, we received a Beats Me question about solar farms displacing cropland, and specifically mentioned a large development proposed for Grant County. So, we went to Grant County for a look.

Teran Powell

Milwaukee has been called one of the most segregated cities in America, and one of the worst places for black people to live and raise their families.

With this in mind, today's Beats Me question put me in the position to try and offer some insight into this question: 

What's the cultural experience for being black and male in Milwaukee?

Emily Files / WUWM

As part of our Beats Me series, we spotlighted Milwaukee Public Schools parent coordinators, who are tasked with the on-the-ground work of connecting families and schools. But that mission extends beyond a single person in each building.

Emily Files / WUWM

Tjuna Eggson has worked in Milwaukee Public Schools for more than 20 years. Twelve of those years, she’s had the title of ‘parent coordinator.’ "One of the things that I found out is the position is really underrated," Eggson says.

Lauren Sigfusson

The topic of recycling evokes a variety of reactions. For some people, their practice is a passion. For others, it's sheer confusion.

We want to help you feel confident that what you throw away lands where it belongs. That's why we recently reached out to you, our listeners, asking for your questions about recycling, reusing or garbage.

Beats Me: What Questions Do You Have For WUWM's Beats Reporters?

Chuck Quirmbach

Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the U.S., close behind heart disease. So, when there's talk of a new cancer drug discovery, patients and their relatives often want to know more about the pharmaceutical and when it might be on the market. 

Teran Powell

With street names like Winnebago and villages such as Mukwonago, there's no denying the historical presence of Native Americans in Wisconsin.

That spurred one of our listeners to reach out to Beats Me:

"What groups of Indigenous people lived in southeastern Wisconsin?"

We're going to answer that question. But we're also going to explore the importance of not just talking in the past tense when it comes to Native Americans.

Chuck Quirmbach

A UW-Milwaukee center that works on disability issues is developing an online way to inform people about access to public buildings like restaurants. It's hoped the computer system will be ready by the time the Democratic National Convention comes to town next summer. But once finished, the access ratings could be used by anyone.

Alesandra Tejeda

Hundreds of communities across the United States have designated themselves a "sanctuary" for immigrant families. Some have created policies vowing they won’t share information about a resident’s immigration status with the federal office of Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE).

But what does a "sanctuary city" really mean? And who has a say in the matter?

Sara McKinnon, a UW-Madison associate professor, says a sanctuary city isn't an official government term.

Emily Files

Several states have taken steps to make college more affordable by creating free-tuition "promise" programs. Each one is different, but in general, they allow students to attend community college, or sometimes public universities, for free.

Alesandra Tejeda

Plastic is difficult to escape. Many products are wrapped, sealed and mailed in some sort of plastic material.

And it can be difficult to know what to do with plastic bags, especially since curbside programs in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin don't accept plastic bags. However, they can be put in collection bins at some grocery stores and other businesses.

Chuck Quirmbach

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers has signed a bill that could speed the introduction of faster wireless service known as 5G to the state. The industry promises that 5G would mean things like better cell phone connections and faster movie downloads.

But there are concerns that 5G, which stands for fifth generation, could bring health problems like cancer to local communities. 

For WUWM's Beats Me series, we received a question about when the Milwaukee area will get 5G. 

Susan Bence

Updated on July 9, 2019  

It looks like Wisconsin's largest landfill is putting off retirement. The owners of Orchard Ridge are asking the Department of Natural Resources to allow them to dig up some 1.3 million cubic yards of contaminated waste and move it elsewhere on the 725-acre property.

Pages