animals

Updated Friday at 9:55 a.m. ET

Police seized 20 pit bulls and about 1,500 hens and roosters, many of which were destined for fighting, from a home in western Wisconsin.

The dogs and birds were "living in deplorable conditions," according to a joint statement issued Thursday by the Pierce County Sheriff's Office and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Hillary Thompson

About an hour northwest of Milwaukee, there's an innovative wrinkle in Wisconsin's ongoing experiment  to create a self-sustaining flock of whooping cranes in the Eastern United States. A family of cranes is living at the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, after two chicks in the family were born in captivity in Florida, and all the birds were flown there by jet.

George Grantham Bain / Wikimedia

Progress is not always linear, and that maxim holds especially true for house cats. While their popularity has wavered over the centuries, cats have been an integral part of human history for millennia.

"They were domesticated, they were raised to the highest of the highs and they were plunged down to the lowest of the lows and then very, very slowly by the end of the 19th century, they finally built themselves up to be companions again," says Paul Koudounaris.

seregraff / Fotolia

Most people who interact with cats on a regular basis have had at least a few perplexing moments with them. Human beings look at cats as fairly inscrutable animals, but cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy would argue that a lot of that confusion comes from what he terms “looking at cats through dog colored glasses.”

Audrey Nowakowski

What sets a great hotel apart?  A comfortable mattress?  A clean room?  Maybe a spiffy bathrobe or a fine restaurant? But above all - memorable service.

The Milwaukee Hilton City Center hotel has a new staff member that will make even the fussiest guest… paws.

Michelle Riley/The HSUS

Viewing and using animals as commodities is nothing new. From the fur trade to trophy hunting, from whaling to the wholesale farming of animals as food and leather, our relationship to our fellow animals has historically often been one of exploitation.

Susan Bence

At last count, Wisconsin was home to more than 230 different species of birds. Now, 1,000 surveyors are pooling data for across the state to see if those numbers are holding.

In the Wisconsin Breeding Bird Atlas II survey, bird experts aren’t counting the ones who simply stop over during migration, rather those that rely on Wisconsin's habitats to multiply.

James Havard / Flickr

Late last month, Wisconsin became one of a handful of states that allow people to rescue people and animals locked in hot cars.  The so-called “Good Samaritan” law is designed to prevent a person with good intentions from incurring a civil penalty for acting.

Photo courtesy of James Sanger

Growing up, Dr. James Sanger loved wildlife and the outdoors. In college, he studied zoology. So when a urologist notified him of an orangutan with an injured hand at the zoo, Sanger happily heeded the call of the wild to help local primates.

Sanger currently serves as the plastic surgery hand surgeon at the Medical College of Wisconsin and chief of plastic surgery at the Zablocki VA Medical Center, but he has been called in as the Milwaukee County Zoo's primate hand specialist for the past 20 years.

A Fake Letter About Fake Deer In Wisconsin

Oct 1, 2015

Fake deer snuck into Wisconsin's annual deer count the past two years.

At least according to a letter sent out on Department of National Resources stationary.

Residents were asked to remove deer lawn ornaments so that they wouldn't be included in this years count.

The department took to Facebook on Wednesday to dispute the story, saying the letter is fake.

But many Wisconsinites had fun with it on Facebook.

Including this concern: "What about the very important annual gnome census?"

MADACC

Thousands of domestic animals in the area go missing or are surrendered to shelters each year.  In Milwaukee, there are two major operations that deal with animal welfare, and while they work together, their missions are different and are often confused by the public.

Over the Labor Day weekend, the Federal Bureau of Land Management will find people in Wisconsin to adopt wild horses. These animals are among the more than 58,000 wild horses and burros the agency is charged with protecting.

The management of those horses has been a challenge for a long time. One solution, which was met with some success more than 20 years ago, was the establishment of a mustang sanctuary in the Midwest.

ashva, Fotolia

There are a number of organizations and agencies in the Greater Milwaukee area that hope you might consider adopting a pet – a rescued dog, a stray cat maybe even a bunny that didn’t work out in a family home after Easter.  But there is a much larger ask that the federal Bureau of Land Management, or BLM, is making this weekend. 

Schlitz Audubon Nature Center, Facebook

If you've ever been to the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center on the lakeshore north of the city, you know there is a lot of the natural world on display. And if you haven't been there, just trust me.

But quantifying everything that lives at or grows on the nature center's grounds is a daunting task, and one that's being taken on by a cadre of scientists beginning Friday afternoon.

Lily Wellen

Over the last six years the University of Minnesota Monarch Lab has collaborated with the US Forest Service to reach teachers around the country with the latest in monarch butterfly biology and ecology. In turn, teachers pass the information on to their students and hope to ignite a passion for conservation.

Pages