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In the past few months there has been a lot of debate over guns that can be made with a 3D printer, which would make it easier for people to get a gun. But there's also a push happening in the tech startup world that is focused on making guns safer. "Smart gun" technology has been around since the 1970s. While the tech has evolved over time, the idea behind it has stayed the same: that only the rightful, registered user of the gun can operate it.

The idea behind "smart guns" is that only the registered owners of firearms are able to unlock and use them. The idea goes back to the 1970s, to a design that used a magnetic ring system that owners could match to their guns. The idea has evolved to use digital innovations. But even though the concept has been around a long time, smart guns still aren't on the market.

Morning News Brief

Aug 13, 2018

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The Trump administration is taking aim at a law that was designed to protect military service members from getting cheated by shady lending practices.

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Fact-Checking Trump's Tweets On The Economy

Aug 13, 2018

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The Baltimore Police Department has accepted the resignation of a police officer after a video went viral. The clip shows the officer repeatedly punching a man in the face. NPR's Merrit Kennedy has the story.

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In the red vs. blue political struggle, which areas are seeing more job growth?

Aug 13, 2018

Many red-county voters who backed Donald Trump in the presidential race did so with the expectation that his leadership would lead to more jobs in their areas. However, a new analysis from the Associated Press has found that most (58.5 percent) of the job gains we've seen this year have been happening in counties that voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016. Josh Boak, an economics writer for the Associated Press, helped put the report together.

Our power grid, then and now

Aug 13, 2018

It all started with a tree and a power line in Ohio. Within hours, electricity was out for some 50 million people across eight states in the Northeast and parts of Canada. It's been 15-years since the 2003 blackout, one of the largest in history, which shut down trains, traffic lights, ATMs, refrigerators and everything else with a plug. So, how's our power grid doing today? Well, things have changed.

For one, there's efficiency. 

The Trump administration is taking aim at a law designed to protect military service members from getting cheated by shady lending practices.

NPR has obtained documents that show the White House is proposing changes that critics say would leave service members vulnerable to getting ripped off when they buy cars. Separately, the administration is taking broader steps to roll back enforcement of the Military Lending Act.

For years, tech employees of companies in Silicon Valley have enjoyed free meals around the clock. That's changing — at least in Mountain View, Calif., where the city is banning the social media giant Facebook from offering free food in its newest office building.

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People from nearly every state in the country responded to a request from NPR on social media to tell us about their experience trying to buy a home. From urban metro areas to distant suburbs, there were common themes of rising home prices coupled with limited options.

In a series of stories NPR has reported on a variety of factors that are contributing to this new housing crisis: a construction labor shortage, rising costs of building materials, a shortage of undeveloped land, and an increasing amount of regulation that limits housing development.

Delay In Manafort Trial

Aug 11, 2018

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We're going to start the program with the trial of President Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, on charges of bank and tax fraud. Yesterday, proceedings took an unexpected turn.

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Before Apple became the world's first private sector company to be worth $1 trillion earlier this month, CEO Tim Cook announced $100 billion worth of stock buybacks.

The move concerned consumer advocate Ralph Nader, who earlier this year, wrote Cook an open letter raising questions about the company's buyback strategy — questions such as who was consulted for the decision, and who stood to profit most.

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