Arts & Culture

Interviews and stories about art, culture, music, books, food / dining and sports.

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Megan McGee

If you love the stories found in the history of Milwaukee’s places and spaces, this weekend must seem like an unofficial local holiday. Doors Open Milwaukee is a two-day event that organizes tours of more than 200 buildings in the metro area – including Bryant’s Cocktail Lounge, which is featured in our second story.

Mompoxino

Luisa Fernanda Garcia is a recent graduate of the UW-Madison Textiles Fashion and Design Program. However, that's not necessarily where she got her start. That process began at home in Colombia where she studied Industrial Design. From there she moved to Paris, France and studied at Paris 8 while simultaneously working at Elle Magazine.

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Ashley Toliver has written her first book of poems - "Spectra." She joins us from Portland, Ore. Thanks so much for being with us.

ASHLEY TOLIVER: Thanks for having me.

The second season of Netflix's American Vandal dropped last Friday. The first season proved a slow-build, under-the-radar, word-of-mouth phenomenon; the second arrived to a devoted and vocal fanbase. Season one was something you started hearing about over the course of weeks and months, from disparate friends and family; full, spoilery reviews of season two were posted at 12:01:01 a.m. last Friday.

When Aly Raisman was a little girl, she used to watch and rewatch the 1996 U.S. women's gymnastics team win the Olympic gold and say to herself: Someday, that will be me. She was right, not once — but twice. Raisman won two team gold medals as captain of the U.S. Olympic teams in 2012 and 2016. And she also won gold for her floor exercise in 2012. Raisman chronicles her career the memoir Fierce: How Competing for Myself Changed Everything.

You think you're accomplishing something in life until you realize that at age 29, playwright Lorraine Hansberry had a play produced on Broadway. Not only did she have a play, but her drama, A Raisin in the Sun, beat out Tennessee Williams and Eugene O'Neill to win the prestigious New York Drama Critics' Circle for the best play of the year. Let that sink in.

On India's west coast, revelers hoist up statues of an elephant-headed god, and parade them toward the Arabian Sea. They sing and chant, and hand out food to bystanders.

For 10 days, they perform pooja — Hindu prayers — at the statues' feet and then submerge them in bodies of water.

This is a tradition in Mumbai, India's biggest city, near the end of each year's monsoon rains: a festival honoring Ganesh, or Lord Ganesha, the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck. He has a human body and an elephant head.

Mitch Teich

The complex world of carbon trading and energy speculation might not seem, at first blush, to be fertile ground for a suspense novel.  But it's familiar territory for writer Paul Schueller — who might not seem, at first blush, to be a likely candidate to write suspense.

Despite being one of the first and oldest forms of popular music, opera sometimes struggles to connect with 21st century audiences. However, Anthony Roth Costanzo is breaking down the genre's stodgy stereotype and making opera more accessible — taking his distinctive sound to the masses, from a sixth-grade classroom in the Bronx to NPR's own Tiny Desk.

vchalup / Fotolia

On Wednesday, a shooter in Middleton injured three people at the software company where he worked, before officers fatally shot him.

There have been over 250 active shooter incidents throughout the United States since 2010: in schools, places of worship and entertainment, workplaces and elsewhere.

On Saturday, Sept. 22, World Cafe presents an evening of live music by the The McCrary Sisters, performing a unique style of gospel influenced by classic soul, Americana, blues and R&B.

For generations, R. Elamparithi's family farmed rice paddies in a lush corner of southeast India that's also dotted with coconut palms and banana groves.

But 10 years ago, a representative from a nearby palm oil production plant visited, and convinced him to switch over to oil palms.

Oil palms grow bunches of fruit that look like dates or small plums, flanked by prickly fronds. The fruit is pressed, yielding palm oil — which is used in all sorts of processed foods, cosmetics and even biofuel.

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