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Looking For Something To Do? Track The Sun's Movement From Home

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As we all spend more time in the same place, why not spend some time observing the sun’s patterns?";

While Wisconsin is having a hard time keeping consistent spring weather, one thing we do notice this time of year is more daylight.

But how does the positioning of the sun change course over the year? And how does it affect us? Our astronomy contributor Jean Creighton says that now is a great time for us to ask these questions. As we all spend more time in the same place, we can be more purposeful in observing the sun’s patterns.

"I just wanted to get us comfortable with the idea that the sun is moving. I hear so many people think, 'well, of course, the sun rises in the east and sets in the west,' even though they have experiences of their own that would belie that statement," notes Creighton.

She joins Lake Effect’s Audrey Nowakowski and invites all of us to do a simple experiment. It can be done outdoors or inside your own home, and all you need to choose is whether to follow the sunrise or sunset:

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Audrey is a producer, host and reporter for Lake Effect. She is involved with every aspect of the show — from conducting interviews, editing audio, posting web stories and mixing the show together.
Dr. Jean Creighton has always been inspired by how the cosmos works. She was born in Toronto, Ontario and grew up in Athens, Greece where her mother claims she showed a great interest in how stars form from the age of five. She studied physics at the University of Athens and went on to earn a Master’s degree from Saint Mary's University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and a PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Waterloo. She began teaching astronomy at UW-Milwaukee in 1999 and in 2007, she took over as director of UWM's Manfred Olson Planetarium.