Kenosha

The Wisconsin Department of Justice is expected to discuss its report soon on the Aug. 23 officer-involved shooting that severely wounded a Black man, Jacob Blake, outside a Kenosha home.

Among those waiting for the report are Kenosha business owners, many of whom have kept boards on their windows and entrance doors out of concern over the potential of more civil unrest, beyond what took place during the first nights after Blake was shot.

Chuck Quirmbach

The first community listening session in Kenosha in the aftermath of the Jacob Blake shooting and subsequent unrest has produced a list of potential changes for the city.

Chuck Quirmbach

Kenosha's mayor has announced the goals of a community improvement plan following last month's police shooting of a Black man, Jacob Blake, and the unrest that followed. Blake was severely wounded when shot seven times by a Kenosha police officer.

Aliza Baran / Milwaukee Magazine

The recent protests and demonstrations for racial justice and police accountability are undoubtedly some of the defining moments of this era. For some, this summer was a breaking point. But for others, like Khalil Coleman, it was the next step of a movement that’s been building for years. 

Coleman is a local community activist and protest organizer, whose work has been crucial to demonstrations in Wisconsin. He was profiled in an article for this month’s Milwaukee Magazine, alongside fellow protest leaders Franky Nitty and Vaun Mayes. 

Olivia Richardson

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris spent Labor Day visiting Milwaukee.

Harris met with Jacob Blake and his family. Blake is the African American father who Kenosha police shot in the back seven times two weeks ago. She then made stops at a local union chapter and spoke with representatives of the city's Black and brown communities. 

Jacob Blake, the 29-year-old Black man who was shot by police in Wisconsin last month, spoke from his hospital bed about the pain of recovery and his hope for the future in a video posted to Twitter by his attorney on Saturday.

Jacob Blake has spoken publicly for the first time since a Kenosha, Wisconsin, police officer shot him seven times in the back, saying he's in constant pain from the shooting, which doctors fear will leave him paralyzed from the waist down.

In a video posted Saturday night on Twitter by his family's lawyer, Ben Crump, Blake said from his hospital bed that, “Twenty-four hours, every 24 hours it’s pain, nothing but pain. It hurts to breathe, it hurts to sleep, it hurts to move from side-to-side, it hurts to eat.”

Adam Rogan / The Journal Times via AP

A militia member patrolling the streets of Kenosha on Aug. 25 claimed that police on the scene told him they planned to herd demonstrators toward the armed men — and then leave.

Police Shooting Spotlights Police Spending In Wisconsin

Sep 5, 2020
Brandon Bell / Getty Images

When the sun rose on Kenosha Wednesday, Aug. 26, former Marine Tim Thompkins said his hometown felt like a battlefield. Smoke lingered in the air from buildings and cars set ablaze the night before. Empty tear gas canisters and pepper bullets littered the streets. Homes were boarded up, and businesses ravaged.

Blake's Father Says Paralyzed Son Optimistic After Shooting

Sep 4, 2020
Scott Olson / Getty Images

Jacob Blake's father said Friday that his “happy-go-lucky” son is optimistic for his future, although he remains paralyzed from the waist down after being shot seven times in the back by a Kenosha police officer.

A clearly exhausted Jacob Blake Sr., speaking by video chat from a Milwaukee hotel, told The Associated Press that the past two weeks have been “surreal” and “like a dream” and he’s mentally worn out. He said he’s been receiving death threats, which he said he couldn’t talk about in detail.

Michael A. McCoy / Getty Images

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris will travel to Milwaukee on Labor Day, the Biden-Harris campaign announced Friday. 

According to a Sunday press release from the campaign, Harris will visit an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers training facility and talk with IBEW members and Wisconsin labor leaders "about Joe Biden's commitment to workers and organized labor."

Scott Olson / Getty Images

The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Wisconsin announced Thursday that two Missouri men who were arrested Sept. 1 in Pleasant Prairie have been charged with illegal possession of firearms.

LaToya Dennis

Dozens of people rallied outside of Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha Thursday. 

That’s where Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden held an invitation-only conversation on how to heal the community. While it was taking place inside, outside the message was simple — Black Lives Matter and police reform is necessary. 

Teran Powell

Updated at 3:41 p.m. CT

A Black journalist quit his job at a Kenosha daily newspaper after disputing a headline for a story about a rally organized by the family of Jacob Blake, a Black man who was shot by a police officer.

Daniel Thompson resigned from his position as a digital editor at The Kenosha News after seeing the headline that was posted online for Saturday's story. The headline read "Kenosha speaker: 'If you kill one of us, it’s time for us to kill one of yours.' "

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Updated at 4:47 p.m. CT

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden began a visit to Wisconsin on Thursday by meeting with the family of Jacob Blake, the Black man whose shooting by a white police officer sparked days of sometimes violent protests.

This was Biden’s first trip to Wisconsin this campaign cycle.

He spoke with Blake on the phone for 15 minutes during his visit. Biden says Blake “talked about how nothing was going to defeat him, about how whether he walked again or not, he was not going to give up.”

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