President Trump

Following two recent mass shootings, about half a dozen Democratic presidential candidates are not mincing their words when it comes to President Trump.

They're calling him a "white supremacist."

"He is," former Rep. Beto O'Rourke said on MSNBC.

President Trump went before cameras on Monday in highly anticipated remarks following the mass shootings in Ohio and Texas over the weekend. In his remarks at the White House, Trump used the words "domestic terrorism" and "white supremacy." He did not acknowledge his own rhetoric.

The president targeted violent video games and drew a connection between mass shootings and mental health, though the research does not back up his assertions.

Updated at 5:01 p.m. ET

President Trump, responding Monday to the deadly weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that killed 31 people, condemned white supremacy and called for the death penalty for mass murderers and domestic terrorists.

Speaking at the White House, Trump said the nation is "overcome with shock, horror and sorrow."

Former special counsel Robert Mueller did what Democrats wanted him to do on Wednesday — the question now is how much difference that may make.

Mueller's hearings did not feature a telegenic star who could deliver a message as exuberantly as President Trump's opponents hoped.

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

Peril from foreign interference in American elections will persist through the 2020 presidential race, former special counsel Robert Mueller warned on Wednesday.

Asked whether Russia would attempt to attack future U.S. elections, as it did in 2016, Mueller replied: "They're doing it as we sit here."

Mueller didn't detail a prescription for how he believes Congress or the United States should respond, but he recommended generally that intelligence and law enforcement agencies should work together.

Updated at 3:14 p.m. ET

Donald Trump took part in phone calls with his then-personal lawyer Michael Cohen as the attorney and other aides scrambled to arrange hush payments to a woman in 2016 to buy her silence about an alleged sexual relationship with Trump.

Those details come from hundreds of pages of court papers — warrant applications, affidavits and other related materials — made public on Thursday.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

A group of four women lawmakers responded to attacks by President Trump with a news conference of their own on Monday evening.

Earlier in the day, Trump said the members of Congress are "free to leave" the country if they are unhappy with the U.S. and accused them of hating America.

Trump To Tout Trade, Economy In Formerly Blue Wisconsin

Jul 12, 2019
Alex Wong / Getty Images

Updated at 3:48 p.m. CT

President Donald Trump is calling on Congress to pass a new trade agreement with Canada and Mexico and send it to his desk immediately. He says, "We shouldn't be playing around."

Trump is lobbying for passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement at Derco Aerospace Inc., in Milwaukee. He is on his sixth visit to the state since taking office.

Trump worries that passage of the agreement could get less likely with time, saying, "it gets more and more political because we get closer and closer to the election."

Zach Gibson / Getty Images

President Donald Trump unloaded via Twitter on Republican former House Speaker Paul Ryan after Ryan's comments critical of Trump appeared in excerpts from a new book.

Alex Wroblewski / Getty Images

President Donald Trump is scheduled to formally announce his reelection bid Tuesday night. Democrats are already after the Republican to answer more questions about his policy on tariffs. Wisconsin U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin is one of the questioners.

President Trump tweeted this month that: 

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

On the day of his self-declared presidential campaign kickoff, President Trump is threatening to deport "millions" of immigrants in the United States illegally beginning "next week."

But what's known is far less definitive.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced an immigration proposal that would dramatically reshape the legal immigration system in the United States.

The plan "puts jobs, wages and safety of American workers first," Trump said in the White House Rose Garden on Thursday.

"We must implement an immigration system that will allow our citizens to prosper for generations to come," he said.

Separate events held Saturday evening in the nation's capital and a Wisconsin arena painted two divergent pictures of the press.

In Washington, the White House Correspondents' Association dinner, an annual comedic event, was light on jokes and replete instead with warnings about the consequences of attacks on the free press.

Meanwhile, President Trump rallied supporters in Green Bay, touting economic growth and repeating familiar calls of "fake news" to a cheering crowd.

Earlier this year, President Trump laid out an ambitious plan for U.S. missile defenses. "Our goal is simple," Trump said during a speech in January. "To ensure that we can detect and destroy any missile launched against the United States, anywhere, anytime, anyplace."

To reach that goal, the administration's proposed new defense budget calls for hundreds of millions of dollars to study the use of lasers and particle beams in space. "It's new technology," the president said.

Except it isn't.

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