President Trump

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Updated at 4:55 p.m. CT

The Marquette Law School Poll released Wednesday shows Joe Biden with a 5-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely voters, 48% to 43%. Since May, Biden has held a 5-point lead over Trump, plus or minus 1 point, in the poll.

Chuck Quirmbach

President Donald Trump contends a "great red wave" of Republican voters will help him carry Wisconsin in the Nov. 3 election. Trump spoke Tuesday evening at a rally in West Salem, near La Crosse.

Public opinion polls show Trump trailing Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in Wisconsin by between 5 and 9 percentage points. But Trump says he has help on the way — if his supporters get out and vote.

"Gotta get out, this is the thing. Just remember, the great red wave,” he told the crowd.

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After two stops in southern Wisconsin over the last two weekends, President Donald Trump takes his reelection campaign to western Wisconsin Tuesday afternoon. He's scheduled to speak in West Salem, near La Crosse.

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse political scientist Anthony Chergosky says the western part of the state remains politically independent and potentially up for grabs. 

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Trump made a campaign stop in the key battleground state of Wisconsin late Saturday evening, marking his seventh trip to the state this year.

His visit to the conservative stronghold of Waukesha comes as the state continues to see surging COVID-19 cases. But that did not stop thousands from gathering for the outdoor rally. Some wore masks, but there was little to no regard for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended guideline of social distancing.

Susan Bence

Despite the weather, wind and pandemic, thousands of people stood shoulder to shoulder on a flag festooned airport tarmac in Janesville Saturday to rally in support of President Donald Trump.

The Republican described the crowd as stretching as far as the eye could see. Trump came out swinging saying he’s the right choice for the "most important election in the history of our country," not his Democratic opponent Joe Biden.

Chuck Quirmbach

President Donald Trump is scheduled to campaign in Janesville Saturday night. Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is asking the president to require all those who attend the rally to wear a mask to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

In fact, Evers said Thursday that he wants all politicians who hold events in Wisconsin to require masks.

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden have very different views on how to tackle America's pressing issues.

That much is clear. But what specifically are they proposing?

NPR Politics has sifted through Trump's and Biden's plans, as released by their campaigns, and narrowed in on a few key issues to show what they're promising and how each man's priorities differ from his opponent's.

Read all of the plans here.

Updated at 8:47 p.m. ET

President Trump plans to deliver remarks on Saturday at an outdoor event, his first public event since being hospitalized for the coronavirus, a White House official confirmed to NPR's Tamara Keith. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the plans.

The event, first reported by ABC News, is expected to take place on the South Lawn of the White House.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

President Donald Trump's once-comfortable advantage in the pivotal region of Wisconsin around the blue-collar hub of Green Bay has dwindled. In suburban Milwaukee, long a Republican-dominated area, it has thinned as well.

And his supporters are far from confident he can find thousands of new voters in the state's sparsely populated rural areas to make up for the setbacks.

Trump's path to victory in Wisconsin, a state he won narrowly in 2016, has become increasingly complicated, and so has his path to the 270 electoral votes needed for his reelection.

Updated Thursday at 12:48 a.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday boasted of his improved health in a video posted to Twitter, calling his coronavirus diagnosis "a blessing from God."

The president's video address is one of several he has posted to the social media site in the days since he was admitted to and ultimately released from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

Updated at 2:07 p.m. CT

Democratic Presidential Candidate Joe Biden still holds a modest advantage over Republican incumbent Donald Trump among Wisconsinites, according to the latest Marquette Law School Poll.

Biden was supported by 46% of likely voters, compared to 41% for Trump. This latest poll has a margin of error of 4.2%.

Updated at 8:18 p.m. ET

President Trump walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening, planning on receiving the remainder of his treatment for COVID-19 at the White House.

He was seen pumping his fist in the air on the way out of the building and didn't respond to any questions from the press. Upon arriving back at the White House, Trump walked up the staircase of the South Portico entrance, removed his mask, gave reporters standing below a thumbs-up and saluted Marine One.

Updated a 2:40 a.m. ET

President Trump sought to project an image of vigor in the face of COVID-19, with a surprise motorcade Sunday outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated, as his physicians suggested he could be discharged to return to the White House as early as Monday.

The president was admitted to Walter Reed on Friday, hours after announcing that he and the first lady had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Updated at 11:57 p.m. ET

President Trump's physician said late Friday evening he is "doing very well" at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and has started Remdesivir therapy, an intravenous anti-viral drug. "He has completed his first dose and is resting comfortably," Sean Conley said in a statement.

Trump was taken to Walter Reed in Bethesda, Md., on Friday after testing positive for the coronavirus.

Evy Mages / Getty Images

Russia is interfering with the 2020 presidential election. That’s according to an assessment by the CIA, which found that Russian President Vladimir Putin and other senior officials are aware of and are probably leading efforts to help President Donald Trump win his reelection campaign.

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