President Trump

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

The country was put on edge overnight as President Trump announced that he and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the coronavirus, a stunning announcement that raises concerns about their health and throws the final stretch of the presidential campaign — already upended by the pandemic — even further into unknown territory.

The couple's 14-year-old son, Barron Trump, has tested negative for the virus, the first lady's chief of staff, Stephanie Grisham, told NPR.

Updated at 10:55 p.m. ET

President Trump and the first lady are quarantining and being tested for the coronavirus after a close adviser to the White House, Hope Hicks, has tested positive for the virus. Hicks is considered one of the president's closest allies and traveled with him on Air Force One both to Tuesday night's debate and to a rally in Minnesota on Wednesday.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

Updated at 2:20 p.m. CT

President Donald Trump canceled a planned appearance in western Wisconsin amid calls from the city's mayor and the state's governor, both Democrats, that he not hold a rally amid a surge in coronavirus cases.

“We have received word that Air Force One is not coming to La Crosse on Saturday, so we are assuming the Trump campaign has changed its plan and is not coming to La Crosse,” Caley Cavadini, spokeswoman for La Crosse Mayor Tim Kabat, said Thursday. Kabat had called for Trump to cancel the rally.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

A New York Times investigation published on Sunday said that President Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes each year in 2016 and 2017, which the president denied at a news conference using a familiar retort: "fake news."

The Times cites Trump's long-sought-after tax returns, further reporting that he paid no income taxes at all in 10 of the previous 15 years as Trump reported massive losses to his businesses.

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Donald Trump was in Wisconsin again Thursday, this time in Mosinee, just north of Stevens Point. It was the first stop on his weekend campaign schedule, which will take him to Minnesota and North Carolina. His visit comes on the heels of Vice President Mike Pence’s stop in Janesville earlier this week.

In austere, starkly divisive remarks, President Trump on Thursday said he would create a commission to promote "patriotic education" and announced the creation of a grant to develop a "pro-American curriculum." The move is largely political — a reaction to a growing push by some academics for schools to teach an American history that better acknowledges slavery and systemic racism.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

President Trump is defending himself after interviews from a new book by legendary reporter Bob Woodward reveal that Trump acknowledged the deadliness of the coronavirus in early February and admitted in March to playing down its severity.

President Trump is making crime a key issue in his reelection campaign, but criminologists worry he and the administration are more interested in using it for political advantage.

Trump's public statements about violence and the actions of his administration in response to this summer's demonstrations don't represent efforts likely to produce a meaningful long-term reduction in crime across the United States, specialists said.

Susan Bence

President Trump visited Kenosha Tuesday in the wake of protests and unrest that have ricocheted through the city.

It was nine days since police shot Jacob Blake in the back, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down, and a week since a 17-year-old from Antioch, Ill., shot and killed two protesters.

Trump surveyed areas damaged by arson and vandalism and held a law enforcement roundtable that was closed to the public.

In the meantime, a crowd gathered at Civic Center Park, where protests have erupted since Blake's shooting.

Win McNamee / Getty Images

President Trump visited Kenosha on Tuesday after protests over the police shooting of Jacob Blake turned to unrest in the city. Trump was there to support law enforcement and is making a clampdown on unrest a key part of his reelection message.

President Trump on Monday declined to condemn the actions of the 17-year-old suspect in the shooting of three protesters against police brutality in Kenosha, Wis., claiming, without evidence, that it appeared the gunman was acting in self-defense.

Emily Files / WUWM

President Donald Trump is set to visit Kenosha Tuesday to meet with law enforcement and to survey damage, after a week of sometimes destructive — and in one case, deadly — protests against police brutality.

But Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers is urging Trump to reconsider— saying Kenosha needs calm right now, instead of more division.

>>Trump To Visit Kenosha Tuesday, Potentially Stoking Tensions

Scott Olson / Getty Images

President Donald Trump will travel to Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, amid fury over the police shooting of Jacob Blake in the back, which left the 29-year-old Black man paralyzed.

White House spokesman Judd Deere told reporters aboard Air Force One on Saturday that Trump will be meeting with law enforcement officers and “surveying” some of the damage from recent protests that turned destructive.

LaToya Dennis

Republicans are working hard to turn out the vote in Wisconsin come Nov. 3. And President Donald Trump's reelection campaign is trying to stay in the spotlight here this week during the virtual Democratic National Convention, which originally was planned as an in-person event in Milwaukee.

Chip Somodevilla / stock.adobe.com

President Trump's son Eric Trump will campaign Tuesday at the office of the Milwaukee Police Association, the union that represents hundreds of Milwaukee officers. Eric Trump is expected to tout an endorsement of his father by the International Union of Police Associations.

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