LaToya Dennis

News Reporter

LaToya Dennis joined WUWM in October 2006 as a reporter / producer. LaToya began her career in public radio as a part-time reporter for WKAR AM/FM in East Lansing, Michigan. She worked as general assignment reporter for WKAR for one and a half years while working toward a master's degree in Journalism from Michigan State University. While at WKAR, she covered General Motors plant closings, city and state government, and education among other critical subjects.

Before coming to public radio, LaToya interned at the CBS affiliate in Lansing, Michigan. She also took part in NPR's 2005 Next Generation Radio Project in Kansas City, Missouri as well as NPR's summer 2006 Next Generation Radio Project in Indianapolis, Indiana.

LaToya holds both a Bachelor's degree and a Masters degree in journalism from Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. Dennis is a member of the National Association of Black Journalists.

Ways to Connect

Milwaukee and Racine immigration advocates are urging President Donald Trump to reconsider his plan to step up deportations of people who Trump says have been given due process and have been ordered to leave the country.

Library of Congress

It’s been 100 years since women in the U.S. gained the right to vote with the passage of the 19th Amendment. And Wisconsin led the way: it was the first state to ratify the amendment.

On Monday, elected officials, prominent Wisconsinites and members of the public gathered at the State Capitol building to celebrate. While many took the opportunity to praise the state and the historical significance of what happened on June 10, 1919, others pointed out that the suffrage movement and women winning the right to vote did not apply to all women.

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Two people are in custody in Waukesha County after an officer involved shooting on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, three Waukesha County Sheriff's Department deputies have been placed on administrative duty. The department is not yet releasing names of those involved. But the shooting occurred after a standoff, when a Department of Natural Resources (DNR) employee pursued stolen vehicle.

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The Milwaukee Common Council Wednesday overwhelmingly voted against approving Denise Bartlett for a seat on the Fire and Police Commission.

Mayor Tom Barrett nominated her to the panel, which oversees the fire and police departments. Bartlett worked for the police department for 28 years before retiring. She took questions from aldermen for nearly two hours. But in the end, many council members didn't think she was fit for the position.

Courtesy of Sabrina Foulks-Thomas

In recent years, a number of black and brown women in Milwaukee have become doulas, and now there’s also a push to train more midwives of color. These trained, licensed medical professionals deliver babies in hospitals, birthing centers, and at homes.

Sabrina Foulks-Thomas, who is black, is one of those midwives. She has done this work for the past three years.

While there are midwives in Milwaukee who have worked in the field for decades, Foulks-Thomas says she recognizes the impact she can have as a black woman.

LaToya Dennis

The city of Milwaukee and Milwaukee County are investing in doulas in hopes reducing the number of black babies who die before the age of one.

READ: Wisconsin has the highest infant mortality rate for black babies in the country. Why?

While doulas don’t have medical training, they do provide emotional, physical and mental support to families before, during and after the arrival of a baby.

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So for a lot of families, there’s this thing that happens when they find out they’re expecting a baby. Once they get past the Is this really happening? stage and all the excitement that can come with knowing you’re growing a life, in can set the worry.

Am I eating the right foods? Am I getting enough sleep? Is this safe for the baby? Is my baby moving enough? How will…. What if… and on, and on.

For me, this was personal. 2018 was a monumental year for my family.

My husband and I welcomed our daughter.

CHICCODODIFC / Fotolia

A controversial pick for the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission has cleared her first hurdle. On Thursday, the Public Safety and Health Committee voted to send the nomination of Denise Bartlett to the full council later this month. 

For critics of Denise Bartlett, it’s not just the fact that for nearly three decades she worked for the Milwaukee Police Department — the entity that as a member of the Fire and Police Commission she would be charged with helping to oversee. Some fear that could lead Bartlett to have a bias toward officers. 

katie wheeler / Flickr

The battle between Democrats and Republicans over the next two-year state budget is in full swing.

Tuesday, members of the Joint Committee on Finance voted unanimously on several measures meant to improve water quality. They included Gov. Tony Evers' plan to borrow $13.5 million for the clean water program and $3.6 million for the safe drinking water loan program.

» Tony Evers Chats About Wisconsin's 'Year Of Clean Drinking Water'

Former Milwaukee Alderman Willie Wade has been indicted for wire fraud.

According to the charges, Wade falsely claimed he was negotiating on behalf of a current Milwaukee alderman to accept a bribe in exchange for a vote in favor of approving licenses for a downtown strip club. Wade allegedly accepted $30,000 via wire transfer, but he wasn't actually working on behalf of any elected Milwaukee official.

Wade has been charged with three counts of wire fraud. Each count carries a maximum of 20 years in prison, $250,000 fine and three years' probation.  

SCREENSHOT/WISCONSIN PUBLIC TELEVISION

Across Wisconsin, tens of thousands of people don’t trust the water that comes out of their tap — due to lead, agricultural runoff or industrial pollution.

To address water quality, there’s $70 million in Gov. Tony Evers’ budget and he's declared 2019 "the year of clean drinking water." However, some in the Republican state Legislature say too much of that money would go to Milwaukee to remove lead water lines, neglecting other areas of the state.

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Susan Bence

With our proximity to Lake Michigan and world-class water research, why don't we have clean water?

WUWM is diving into the topic of clean water, or the lack there of, in southeastern Wisconsin for our Project Milwaukee Series: Great Lakes, Troubled Waters.

LaToya Dennis

Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez and his team have hit the ground running in Milwaukee planning the 2020 presidential nominating convention.

Perez stopped by the Newsroom Pub in downtown Milwaukee Tuesday afternoon, and spoke to the media while there. Perez says already the DNC is working on a number of logistics. He says there’s a lot of work to do, but that’s always the case when preparing for a convention. He says he cannot underscore enough the importance of the convention.

Two Wisconsin residents have pleaded guilty to supporting the terrorist group ISIS, according to the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, Matthew Krueger.

Waheba Dais, a Cudahy resident, admitted to using hacked Facebook accounts in order to support ISIS, pledged her allegiance to the organization and disseminated information about explosives and biological weapons and attempted to recruit new members.

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Updated on April 9 at 4:52 p.m. CT

An appeals court on Tuesday sided with Democratic Gov. Tony Evers in declining to reinstate 15 people appointed by former Republican Gov. Scott Walker. State lawmakers had been holding off on confirming Evers’ appointments because of the dispute over whether the governor had the power to make the appointments. Republican lawmakers have said they expect the matter to end up before the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

Original Story March 27

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