Gov. Scott Walker

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Wisconsin's former Republican Gov. Scott Walker said Friday that his 25-year-old son is considering running for an open congressional seat in a suburban Milwaukee district.

Walker told WISN-TV in an interview that his son, Matt, is interested in the traditionally conservative seat that includes the city of Wauwatosa, where he was born and grew up. Matt Walker, a 2016 Marquette University graduate, has never run for public office.

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Former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said he won't run for office again in 2022 because he has accepted a new full-time job running a group based in Washington, D.C., that promotes conservative ideas among young people.

The Republican had been openly considering running for his old job as governor or for U.S. Senate in 2022. But Walker told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in a story published Monday that his job as president of the Young America's Foundation, which is based in the Washington area, will make it impossible for him to run for office in 2022.

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Gov. Scott Walker told the Associated Press he would be interested in running for office again, possibly even governor of Wisconsin in four years. He also said he’s moving from the governor’s mansion in Madison to downtown Milwaukee.

Walker is going to be replaced by Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers on Monday, Jan. 7. Walker plans to hit the speaking circuit and be President Donald Trump’s chief advocate in Wisconsin.

Emily Files

It's been an interesting year for education in Wisconsin. With 2018 coming to a close, let's look back at some of the biggest education stories in the state.

Education was a central topic in the contest between incumbent Scott Walker and challenger Tony Evers.  Walker called himself "the education governor."

"In the last budget, we gave the largest actual-dollar investment in K-12 education in the history of this state," Walker said in his first debate against Evers. 

Marti Mikkelson

With just over six months until the mid-term elections, Vice President Mike Pence fired up a crowd of Republican voters in downtown Milwaukee Wednesday. He focused on the GOP tax cuts in particular, in a speech at the Wisconsin Center. The vice president also hosted a fundraiser for Gov. Walker, who faces a potentially tough reelection bid this fall.

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Vice President Mike Pence will be in Milwaukee on Wednesday to help fill Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign coffers.

Pence is scheduled to host a fundraiser for the Republican governor at night. During the day, he will talk about the Republican tax plan at the Wisconsin Center in downtown Milwaukee. The group America First Policies is hosting the event.

A national group led by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder filed a lawsuit this week against Gov. Walker -- for not calling special elections in two vacant legislative seats.  Instead, Walker has scheduled them during this year's regularly scheduled elections in August and November.  

Screen capture from Gov. Walker's YouTube channel.

Gov. Scott Walker gave his eighth State of the State Address Wednesday afternoon. Speaking to the full Legislature, the Republican governor told lawmakers that 2017 was a "historic" year for Wisconsin, and that the state is in an amazing period of prosperity and promise.

"And you know what? We're just getting started. Foxconn, for example, will begin construction this year on a $10 billion campus," Walker said.

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Gov. Walker is bringing in a heavy hitter to help him raise campaign money – President Trump. He’s scheduled to host an event Tuesday for the governor in southeastern Wisconsin.

Walker says he’s thrilled the president is coming here, even though Trump remains embroiled in a probe into possible ties with Russia. And, even though the two leaders have a rocky history.

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There’s been continued speculation on who might challenge Gov. Scott Walker in 2018. Walker has indicated that if he will run for a third term, he’ll announce this summer.

Since the beginning of the year, a number of well-known Wisconsin Democrats decided not to run for governor in 2018 - dramatically thinning the field. They include Congressman Ron Kind and state Sen. Minority Leader Jennifer Schilling, along with former state Sen. Tim Cullen of Janesville. Cullen concluded he could not generate what he’d need to challenge a two-time incumbent.

LaToya Dennis

During a stop in Wauwatosa Wednesday, Governor Walker revealed more about his upcoming two-year budget proposal. He said he's ready to put forth money to help keep families intact, while revamping the welfare system.

Walker said he wants to adjust the Earned Income Tax Credit - a program he trimmed in 2011. The governor told the audience at the Wauwatosa Rotary Club that he plans to eliminate the EITC's marriage penalty.

Gov. Scott Walker
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During his seventh State of the State address on Tuesday, Gov. Walker said the state of Wisconsin is as strong as it has ever been.

Walker vowed to prioritize K12 and college education, transportation and broadband expansion in his upcoming budget. 

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Wisconsin is asking federal lawmakers for more control. Gov. Walker on Tuesday addressed a letter to President-elect Donald Trump asking for more flexibility in administering federal programs. 

For instance, Walker wants to drug test people who apply for Food Share benefits and control the number of certain refugees allowed to settle in the state. Walker says the changes would help the citizens of Wisconsin.              

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Gov. Scott Walker is strongly hinting that he’ll run for a third term in 2018. 

Walker swept into office in the tea party wave of 2010, while Republicans took both houses of the Legislature. He dropped jaws when he announced he would gut public unions, then he was able to pass other landmark pieces of legislation, including statewide expansion of voucher schools. But, there are challenges ahead, should he decide to mount another campaign.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley said Tuesday the fact that Republicans now control the White House, Congress and so many governors' mansions has left her "giddy."

Haley and the rest of the Republican Governors Association are meeting this week in Orlando, Fla., to discuss their party's victories last week and how they hope to work with President-elect Donald Trump.

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